Administration for Children and Families
 
 
Administration for Native Americans
 
Social and Economic Development Strategies -SEDS
HHS-2018-ACF-ANA-NA-1339
Application Due Date: 04/15/2019
Due Date for Applications:

04/15/2019

04/15/2020

 
Social and Economic Development Strategies -SEDS
HHS-2018-ACF-ANA-NA-1339
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
    1. Overview
    2. Executive Summary
    1. Program Description
    2. Federal Award Information
    3. Eligibility Information
      1. Eligible Applicants
      2. Cost Sharing or Matching
      3. Other
    4. Application and Submission Information
      1. Address to Request Application Package
      2. Content and Form of Application Submission
      3. Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management
        (SAM)
      4. Submission Dates and Times
      5. Intergovernmental Review
      6. Funding Restrictions
      7. Other Submission Requirements
    5. Application Review Information
      1. Criteria
      2. Review and Selection Process
      3. Anticipated Announcement and Federal Award Dates
    6. Federal Award Administration Information
      1. Federal Award Notices
      2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements
      3. Reporting
    7. HHS Awarding Agency Contact(s)
    8. Other Information
 
 
HHS-2018-ACF-ANA-NA-1339
Social and Economic Development Strategies -SEDS
ANNOUNCEMENT MODIFICATION | VALIDATE & APPROVE
Department of Health & Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
 
Funding Opportunity Title:Social and Economic Development Strategies -SEDS
Announcement Type:Modification
Funding Opportunity Number:HHS-2018-ACF-ANA-NA-1339
Primary CFDA Number: 93.612
Due Date for Applications: 04/15/2019
 
Due Date for Applications:

04/15/2019

04/15/2020

 
Executive Summary

Notice: 

  • Applicants are strongly encouraged to read the entire funding opportunity announcement (FOA) carefully and observe the application formatting requirements listed in Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission. For more information on applying for grants, please visit "How to Apply for a Grant" on the ACF Grants & Funding Page at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/howto.

This FOA has been modified. The Application due date has been updated for Fiscal Year 2019. In addition, clarifications have been made in the following sections: III.3 Eligibility Information, Other; IV.2 Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description; IV.4, Application and Submission Information, Submission Dates and Times; and V.1, Application Review Information, Criteria. 

 

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Administration for Native Americans (ANA) announces the availability of fiscal year (FY) 2019 funds for community-based projects for the Social and Economic Development Strategies (SEDS) program. This FOA is focused on community-driven projects designed to grow local economies, strengthen Native American families, including the preservation of Native American cultures, and decrease the high rate of current challenges caused by the lack of community-based businesses, and social and economic infrastructure in Native American communities.  Native American communities include American Indian tribes (federally-recognized and non-federally recognized), Alaskan Natives, Native Hawaiians and Native American Pacific Islanders.

 

I. Program Description

Statutory Authority

This program is authorized under Section 803(a) of the Native American Programs Act of 1974 (NAPA), 42 U.S.C. 2991b.

Description

The Administration for Native Americans 

Within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), ANA serves all Native Americans, including federally recognized tribes, American Indian and Alaska Native organizations, Native Hawaiian organizations, and Native populations throughout the Pacific Basin (including American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). ANA promotes social and economic self-sufficiency for Native American communities in two ways. First, ANA provides discretionary grant funding, training, and technical assistance in support of community-based projects that address the current social and economic conditions in Native American communities. Second, ANA promotes social and economic self-sufficiency through advocacy and policy development on behalf of Native Americans. ANA’s programmatic goals include: (1) fostering the development of stable diversified local economies to encourage community partnerships and reduce dependency on public funds and social services; (2) supporting local access to, control of and coordination of services and programs that safeguard the health and well-being of native children and families; (3) increasing the number of projects involving youth and intergenerational activities in Native American communities.

ANA supports community-based projects in four major program areas: Social and Economic Development Strategies (SEDS), Native Languages, Environmental Regulatory Enhancement, and Community Research, Demonstration, and Pilot Projects. The purpose of the SEDS program area is to promote the health, safety, and well-being of American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native American Pacific Islanders from American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Mariana Islands. The SEDS program supports the principle that social and economic developments are inter-related and essential for the development of thriving Native American communities.

ANA funding is meant for projects that are implemented within a defined project period, and identify direct, measurable outcomes that will be achieved within the proposed project period.

ANA funds are not to be used as pass-through funding and must be administered by the applicant's organization.

No projects shall be approved for assistance under this title unless the Commissioner is satisfied that the activities to be carried out under such project will be in addition to, and not in substitution for, comparable activities previously carried out without federal assistance.  

SEDS PROGRAM

OVERVIEW

The purpose of the SEDS program is to promote economic and social self-sufficiency for American Indians, Alaska Natives (AI/AN), Native Hawaiians, and Native American Pacific Islanders from American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The SEDS program supports the principle that social and economic development are inter-related and essential for the development of thriving Native communities. ANA is interested in supporting community-driven projects designed to grow local economies, increase the capacity of tribal governments, strengthen families, preserve Native cultures, and increase self-sufficiency and community well-being. Funded SEDS projects will reflect outcomes and include specific strategies for enhancing or improving community conditions and achieving long-range community goals.

PURPOSE 

The SEDS program is designed to support community-based projects that increase the ability for Native Americans to define and achieve their own economic and social goals and/or the capacity to exercise local control and decision-making to promote the interests of community members.  SEDS projects focus on one or more of the following three inter-related concepts, which form a foundation for self-sufficiency: (1) Social Development, supporting local access to, control of, and coordination with, programs and services that safeguard the health, well-being, and culture of Native peoples; (2) Economic Development, fostering the development of stable, diversified local economies and economic activities that provide jobs and business opportunities that promote economic well-being and self-sufficiency in Native American communities; and (3) Governance, assisting tribes, Native American organizations and Alaska Native village governments to increase their ability to enhance their administrative infrastructure and capacity to develop and enforce laws, regulations, codes, and policies that reflect and promote the interests of community members.

Program Areas of Interest

Program areas of interest for this FOA include, but are not limited to, the following:

Social Development: Projects that develop and implement culturally appropriate strategies to meet the social service needs of Native Americans. Examples include:

  • Community Living - Developing and coordinating services to assist people with disabilities and elders by helping them reach their maximum potential through increased independence, productivity, and integration within the community.
  • Early Childhood Development - Supporting stable and high-quality, culturally appropriate childhood education programs; creating early childhood education jobs; and improving community-wide planning and coordination of early childhood programs.
  • Youth Development - Improving the well-being of youth through life-skills training,  leadership development, workforce development training, mentoring programs, cultural connectedness, educational enhancements, and juvenile crime prevention.
  • Community Health - Promoting improved access to care and quality of care through coordinated local and regional approaches, expanding access to healthy foods, and supporting environmental health.
  • Arts and Culture - Developing or enhancing activities that promote, preserve, or restore Native culture and arts.
  • Safety and Security - Developing or enhancing community-based initiatives to protect the community from external threats and reduce insecurity, violence, and crime.
  • Substance Abuse - Community outreach, education programs, and coordination that support the prevention of substance abuse, including opioid addiction.
  • Organizational Development - Increasing organizational capacity to successfully implement mission and goals.
  • Nutrition and Fitness - Promoting increased knowledge and participation in activities that promote healthy foods, active lifestyles, the reduction of obesity, reduction of childhood obesity, and other healthy-living habits.
  • Strengthening Families and Responsible Parenting - Incorporating culturally relevant strategies to strengthen families and promote family preservation, healthy relationship skills, responsible parenting (including responsible fatherhood), marriage preservation and counseling, and fostering the well-being of children.
  • Addressing Mental Health - Promoting safety, resilience, and protective factors necessary to foster mental health, reduce incidences of suicide and suicidal ideation, and respond to the effects of historical trauma.

  • Human Trafficking - Working to identify, report, and prevent human trafficking, and providing outreach and services for victims.

 

Economic Development: Projects that promote the creation of a sustainable local economy. Examples include:

  • Agriculture - Creating, developing, or enhancing agricultural enterprise and sustainable farming projects with a focus on distribution at local and commercial markets.
  • Asset Building - Increasing availability of effective financial education and other asset-building strategies for individuals and families.
  • Career Pathways - Using multi-sector partnerships with entities such as Tribal Colleges, workforce development agencies, social service providers, and employers to develop workforce training programs that respond to local employers’ hiring needs.
  • Commercial Trade - Strengthening local economies by increasing the availability of, or demand for, locally produced goods and services.
  • Economic Competitiveness -  Creating, expanding, and retaining businesses to reflect distinct economies operating in rural and urban areas, in both mature and emergent sectors.
  • Economic Infrastructure -  Addressing economic infrastructure needs that will strengthen business development and job creation in native communities.
  • Entrepreneurship and Microbusiness - Promoting entrepreneurial development through business incubators and other activities that support businesses and market the availability of local products or services.
  • Local Sourcing and Technology -  Using new technologies to enhance distribution channels for locally produced goods and services.
  • Place-based Strategies - Using a tribe or community’s local or regional assets and resources and collaborating with multiple stakeholders to address economic development barriers.
  • Preparation for Work - Developing activities that promote short- and long-term job creation by supporting targeted training of individuals to develop new technical skills, secure new credentials, and gain experience that will lead to jobs created and increased earned income. 
  • Economic Stability - Conducting the necessary planning and/or research to support achievement of long-range economic development goals. Examples may include establishing a separate division to administer economic development programs or performing gap or value-added analyses to identify strengths and weaknesses in the local economy. Strengthening an organization’s capacity to deliver programs that promote economic development and security.
  • Subsistence - Enhancing subsistence and agricultural activities to retain or revitalize traditional native food sources and practices.
  • Tourism - Planning or developing resources, services, and businesses that promote travel, recreation, and tourism, or branding to tell the story of Native Americans as the First Peoples of the United States.  Projects may utilize the arts or other cultural resources to help revitalize Native communities, promote economic development, increase livability, and present the uniqueness of the Native communities to visitors in a way that celebrates the diversity of the United States.

Governance: Governance is defined as increasing the ability of tribal and Alaska Native village governments to exercise local control and decision-making, and to develop and enforce laws, regulations, codes, and policies that reflect and promote the interests of community members. Examples include:

  • Federal Recognition - Offering one-time support to tribes during any stage in the process of seeking federal recognition.
  • Emergency Preparedness - Planning and coordinating emergency response services within the community and with state and local governments to protect against the acts of nature and other catastrophic events such as floods and hazardous material exposure.
  • Integration - Promoting program coordination among human and social service programs for native communities to strengthen the programs they provide to their children, youth, and families.
  • Comprehensive Strategies - Developing comprehensive intergovernmental strategies involving tribal, state, and federal governments to meet the needs of community members.
  • Self-Governance Infrastructure and Planning - Building the capacity and infrastructure to enter into self-governance compacts and other arrangements with funding agencies to take advantage of administrative flexibilities to more effectively operate programs.
  • Leadership Skills - Enriching and strengthening the management and organizational capacities of tribal governments, governing boards, tribally owned enterprises, and community leaders.
  • Technology Infrastructure - Establishing and implementing information management systems for effective and efficient administration of tribal governments and governing boards.
  • Governmental Administration - Developing and amending tribal constitutions, by-laws and codes, and council or executive branch policies and procedures to improve the regulatory, judicial, and administrative infrastructure of tribal and village governments; supporting and enforcing business and investment transactions, contracts, and property rights; rights and procedures addressing family and child welfare issues; and enhance intergovernmental relations, including clarifying tribal jurisdiction.
  • ACF Program Support - Strengthening infrastructure and increased capacity for tribal governments and governing boards to operate various ACF program.

 ANA PROJECT FRAMEWORK

Since FY2018, ANA's FOAs outlined and requested information to address the ANA project framework. The ANA project framework is intended to outline the project in a way that focuses long-term community goals toward achievable and measurable project outcomes. ANA’s project framework includes a long-term community goal, current community condition, project goal, objectives, indicators, outcomes, and outputs. Together these components relate a long-term goal for the community to a specific project goal, define targets for project achievement, and provide structure to measure project outcomes. The ANA project framework must demonstrate a logical relationship that connects all concepts.

Additional information about the components of the ANA project framework can be found in Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description, Expected Outcomes.

 

PROJECT MONITORING TOOLS

Since FY2018, ANA also required information to address an outcome tracking strategy. The outcome tracking strategy must be used along with the Objective Work Plan (OWP), throughout project planning and implementation to identify and monitor the steps towards achieving project objectives.

Outcome Tracking Strategy
The outcome tracking strategy is designed to be used during project implementation to collect data and support project staff in monitoring their own progress towards achieving anticipated outcomes. The outcome tracking strategy includes a narrative description of the means for measuring project progress, and includes who and how the project will collect, manage and analyze data.  An outcome tracker provides a visual format that aligns project information with projected targets for achievement at the end of each year of project implementation.

Applicants are encouraged to format the outcome tracker as described in the Appendix C, Outcome Tracker.

See Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description and the Appendix C, Outcome Tracker for additional information.

Objective Work Plan (OWP)

The OWP is a required form approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) that serves as a blueprint for project implementation. The OWP form and its instructions are available in the FOA's Grant Application Package at www​.grant​s​.gov​ and on the Grants.gov Forms/SF-424 Family page at http​://www​.grant​s​.gov​/web​/grant​s​/forms​/sf​-424​- famil​y​.html​. The OWP form and its instructions are also available at http​://www​.acf​.hhs​.gov​/progr​ams​/ana​/resou​rce​/objec​tive​-work​-plan​.

Applicants are encouraged to use the OWP form on Grant​s​.gov​.

See Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description for additional information.

 KEY PROJECT FEATURES

Community-Based Strategy: ANA emphasizes projects that are designed around community-based priorities for self-sufficiency; therefore successful applications must address a community-based strategy for implementation and sustainability of project goals, measurable outcomes and objectives. See Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description for additional information.

Key Personnel: It is vital to the success of any project that key personnel are qualified and available. Successful applications must fully plan for project staffing, including recruitment, retention, and contingencies for key staff positions.

If known at the time of submission, applications must identify who will be the Principal Investigator/Project Director (PI/PD) and Authorized Organizational Representative (AOR) for the project. Responsibilities for monitoring progress and maintaining oversight of program reporting, staff, and partners must be assigned to one of these two positions, and the separation of these duties must be identified. In addition, the AOR will have official signing responsibility for the grant. (See Definitions in Appendix B for PI/PD, and AOR) The applicant should also identify who is responsible for the financial administration of the project. The AOR and PI/PD cannot be the same person.

If a permanent PI/PD, or AOR, is unknown, the applicant must identify who will take on these roles until the position is filled, and demonstrate that the temporary candidate(s) are available to commit the time necessary for project implementation.  The applicant also must provide a timeline and plan for filling both roles with permanent personnel.

If, during the course of the project, there is a change of personnel for the PI/PD and/or AOR, the applicant shall notify ANA of the change of leadership.

See Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description for additional information.

 ANA ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES

Prioritized Funding for Community-Based Native American Organizations

ANA reserves the right to prioritize funding to community-based Native American organizations serving their local communities and populations. Applications from non-local, national, and regional organizations that propose projects to serve multiple communities, or to be performed in a different geographic location, must clearly demonstrate that the need for the project was originated by each community being served, and that the community and/or tribal government supports the proposed project.  They must also describe how each community was selected, identify and describe the intended beneficiaries, demonstrate community involvement in the development of the project, and discuss a community-based delivery strategy for the project. The proposed project goals, objectives, and outcomes must address goals of the community being served. National and regional organizations must describe their membership, and define how the organization operates. The type of community to be served will determine the type of documentation necessary to support the project. 

Required Grantee Travel and Attendance at Post-Award Meetings

Grantees will be required to have two individuals working directly on the project to attend Post Award Training during the first year of their award and attend an annual ANA Grantee Meeting during each year of their ANA award. Please refer to Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description, and The Project Budget and Budget Justification, and the Appendix A, Suggested Travel Costs for more information on how to include this in the budget.

 Limitation on the Number of Awards Under a Single CFDA Number 

Grantees can have only one active grant per Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number.(See CFDA definition located in Appendix B, Definitions and Section III.3. Eligibility Information, Other).

Limitation on the Number of Awards Based on Two Consecutive Funding Cycles

ANA will maximize the reach of its limited funding. Therefore, applicants that have implemented at least two consecutive projects within one CFDA number may not be funded for a third consecutive project within the same CFDA number if other applicants who have not received ANA funding in the past 3 years are within the scoring range to be funded. Project implementation periods include newly awarded first year project periods, Non Competing Continuations (NCC) periods, and No Cost Extensions (NCE) periods. See Section V.2. Review and Selection Process, ANA Internal Review of Proposed Projects for additional information. 

 

Compliance with Background Checks and Applicable Child Safety Laws

All recipients are expected to comply with applicable federal, tribal, and state law with respect to criminal history record checks and clearance through child abuse and neglect and sex offender registries.

Conflict of Interest Standards

Under 45 CFR §75.112, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awarding agencies must establish conflict of interest policies for federal awards. The non-federal entity must  disclose in writing any potential conflict of interest to the respective HHS awarding agency or pass-through entity in accordance with 45 CFR §75.112 (a)(1)-(a)(3) and other subsequent applicable HHS awarding agency's policy. 

It is longstanding ANA policy to preclude members of governing body of grantee organizations from paid employment under an ANA-funded project in order to preserve the independence and impartiality of governing body members and avoid conflicts of interest. The regulations provide for an exception under 45 CFR §1336.50 (f), which permits the Chief Executive of the grantee to serve as project staff with the salary and expenses of the Office of Chief Executive allowable costs under the ANA grant provided such costs are directly related to the project and do not include the costs of general government.  A grantee must request prior approval from ANA for such an exemption.  

Federal Evaluation

Under Section 811 of NAPA, ANA is required to provide an evaluation of funded projects including evaluations that describe and measure the success of such projects, their effectiveness in achieving stated goals, and their structure and mechanism for delivery of services. ANA currently undertakes a federally sponsored evaluation strategy to assess the effectiveness and success of approved projects. The on-going federal evaluation strategy will include review of grantee-level documentation including, but not limited to, Objective Progress Reports (OPR) and the Annual Data Report (ADR). In accepting a grant award, all grantees agree to participate fully in the federal evaluation if selected, and to follow all evaluation protocols established by ANA or its designee contractor(s).

Currently, federal project evaluations culminate in end-of-project site visits from ANA during which evaluators utilize structured interview tools. The information covered during such site visits follows up on information provided in the grantee’s initial grant application, and require outcomes to be tracked by project staff through the OPR and ADR throughout the project period.

Pre-Application Teleconferences or Webinars

ANA may conduct a pre-application teleconference or webinar about our annual FOAs. If scheduled, the date, time, registration, and call-in information will be available on ACF’s ANA website at http​://www​.acf​.hhs​.gov​/ana​. Pre-application teleconference or webinar materials may be accessed on the same website.

Joining and participating in the teleconference or webinar is voluntary. Only the information provided in this FOA will be presented. No question and answer period will be offered during the session.  Participants will remain anonymous. Opting not to participate in the webinar will not affect eligibility, application scoring, or the selection process. Applicants unable to attend can access the recording and transcript on the ANA website after the teleconference or webinar has concluded

Definitions
Program-specific terms and concepts described in this FOA are found in Appendix B. Definitions.

II. Federal Award Information
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Estimated Total Funding: $8,400,907
Expected Number of Awards: 25
Award Ceiling: $400,000 Per Budget Period
Award Floor: $100,000 Per Budget Period
Average Projected Award Amount: $280,000 Per Budget Period
Anticipated Project Start Date: 09/30/2019

Length of Project Periods:

Length of Project Period: 12-month project period and budget period
24-month project period with two 12-month budget periods
36-month project period with three 12-month budget periods

 

Applicants may propose projects with project periods consisting of either 12, 24, or 36 months.

 

 

Additional Information on Awards:

Awards made under this announcement are subject to the availability of federal funds.

Applications requesting an award amount that exceeds the Award Ceiling per budget period, or per project period, as stated in this section, will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. This disqualification applies only to the Award Ceiling listed for the first 12-month budget period for projects with multiple budget periods. If the project and budget period are the same, the disqualification applies to the Award Ceiling listed for the project period. Please see Section III.3. Other, Application Disqualification Factors.

Note: For those programs that require matching or cost sharing, recipients will be held accountable for projected commitments of non-federal resources in their application budgets and budget justifications by budget period or by project period for fully funded awards, even if the projected commitment exceeds the required amount of match or cost share. A recipient's failure to provide the required matching amount may result in the disallowance of federal funds. See Section III.2. of this announcement for information on cost-sharing or matching requirements.

Non-Competing Continuation Awards

An initial grant award will be for a 12-month budget period. The NCC award for projects approved for more than one budget period will be awarded on the basis of submission and approval of annual NCC applications, availability of funds, satisfactory progress, on-time completion of grant reporting requirements, and a determination that the continued funding would be in the best interest of the Federal Government. 

 

 

Please see Section IV.6. Funding Restrictions for limitations on the use of federal funds awarded under this announcement.

III. Eligibility Information

III.1. Eligible Applicants

Pursuant to 42 U.S.C. §2991b and 45 CFR §1336.33, eligible applicants under this announcement are: 

  • Federally recognized Indian tribes, as recognized by the Bureau of Indian Affairs;
  • Incorporated non-federally recognized tribes;
  • Incorporated state-recognized Indian tribes;
  • Consortia of Indian tribes;
  • Incorporated non-profit multi-purpose community-based Indian organizations;
  • Urban Indian Centers;
  • Alaska Native villages as defined in the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) and/or non-profit village consortia;
  • Non-profit native organizations in Alaska with village-specific projects;
  • Incorporated non-profit Alaska Native multipurpose, community-based organizations;
  • Non-profit Alaska Native Regional Corporations/Associations in Alaska with village-specific projects;
  • Non-profit Alaska Native community entities or tribal governing bodies (Indian Reorganization Act or Traditional Councils) as recognized by the Bureau of Indian Affairs;
  • Public and non-profit private agencies serving Native Hawaiians;
  • National or regional incorporated non-profit Native American organizations with Native American community-specific objectives;
  • Public and non-profit private agencies serving native peoples from Guam, American Samoa, or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands;
  • Tribal Colleges and Universities, and colleges and universities located in Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa, or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands that serve Native American Pacific Islanders.

Please refer to Section III.3. Other, ANA Disqualification Factors, for additional eligibility requirements. 

Applications from individuals (including sole proprietorships) and foreign entities are not eligible and will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. See Section III.3. Other, Application Disqualification Factors.

Faith-based and community organizations that meet the eligibility requirements are eligible to receive awards under this funding opportunity announcement.
See Section IV.2. Legal Status of Applicant Entity for documentation required to support eligibility.
 

III.2. Cost Sharing or Matching

Cost Sharing / Matching Requirement: Yes
Grantees are required to meet a non-federal share of the project cost, in accordance with 42 U.S.C. 2991b(b).
Grantees must provide at least 20 percent of the total approved cost of the project. The total approved cost of the project is the sum of the ACF (federal) share and the non-federal share. The non-federal share may be met by cash or in-kind contributions, although applicants are encouraged to meet their match requirements through cash contributions. For example, in order to meet the match requirements, a project requesting $400,000.00 in ACF (federal) funds must provide a non-federal share of the approved total project cost of at least $100,000.00 , which is 20 percent of total approved project cost of $500,000.00 .

For all federal awards, any shared costs or matching funds and all contributions, including cash and third-party in-kind contributions, must be accepted as part of the recipient’s cost sharing or matching when such contributions meet all of the criteria listed in 45 CFR 75.306.

For awards that require matching by statute, recipients will be held accountable for projected commitments of non-federal resources in their application budgets and budget justifications by budget period, or by project period for fully funded awards, even if the projected commitment exceeds the amount required by the statutory match. A recipient’s failure to provide the statutorily required matching amount may result in the disallowance of federal funds. Recipients will be required to report these funds in the Federal Financial Reports.

For awards that do not require matching or cost sharing by statute, where “cost sharing” refers to any situation in which the recipient voluntarily shares in the costs of a project other than as statutorily required matching, recipients will be held accountable for projected commitments of non-federal resources in their application budgets and budget justifications by budget period, or by project period for fully funded awards. These include situations in which contributions are voluntarily proposed by an applicant and are accepted by ACF. Non-federal cost sharing will be included in the approved project budget so that the applicant will be held accountable for proposed non-federal cost-sharing funds as shown in the Notice of Award (NOA). A recipient’s failure to provide voluntary cost sharing of non-federal resources that have been accepted by ACF as part of the approved project costs and that have been shown as part of the approved project budget in the NOA, may result in the disallowance of federal funds. Recipients will be required to report these funds in the Federal Financial Reports.

ANA COMMITMENT OF CASH OR IN-KIND CONTRIBUTION

Applicants must establish proof of the firm commitment of cash or in-kind contributions for at least the first budget period by submitting documentation, such as a letter or other proof, from the source of such resources. See Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Budget and Budget Justification.

ANA MATCH WAIVER

Applicants may request a waiver of the requirement for a 20 percent match. To receive a waiver or a reduction in the required match, the applicant must provide ANA with written documentation of their need. This request must establish whether the applicant satisfies each waiver criteria in 45 CFR §1336.50(b)(3). The waiver request should be submitted with the application as an attachment.  Approval of the waiver request cannot be assumed by the applicant without written notification from ANA. Waiver requests will not result in a deduction of points in the evaluation of the application. 

45 CFR §1336.50(b)(3):

"(3) Criteria. Both of the following criteria must be met for an applicant to be eligible for a waiver of the non-Federal matching requirement:

(i) Applicant lacks the available resources to meet part or all of the non-Federal matching requirement. This must be documented by an institutional audit if available, or a full disclosure of applicant's total assets and liabilities.

(ii) Applicant can document that reasonable efforts to obtain cash or in-kind contributions for the purposes of the project from third parties have been unsuccessful. Evidence of such efforts can include letters from possible sources of funding indicating that the requested resources are not available for that project. The requests must be appropriate to the source in terms of project purpose, applicant eligibility, and reasonableness of the request."

For inquiries about the waiver process, contact your regional technical assistance provider. Refer to Section VIII. Other Information, Reference Websites, for the contact information.

Matching Waiver Pursuant to 48 U.S.C. § 1469a(d)

Matching requirements (including in-kind contributions) of less than $200,000 (up to $199,999) are waived under grants made to the governments of American Samoa, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (other than those consolidated under other provisions of 48 U.S.C. 1469) pursuant to 48 U.S.C. 1469a(d). This waiver applies whether the matching required under the grant equals or exceeds $200,000.
 

III.3. Other

PROJECTS INELIGIBLE FOR FUNDING

45 CFR §1336.33(b) has the effect of making the following projects ineligible for funding under this announcement:

  • Projects for which a grantee will provide third-party training and technical assistance to other tribes or Native American organizations or to non-members of the grantee organization.
  • Projects that require funding for feasibility studies, business plans, marketing plans, or written materials such as manuals that are not an essential part of the applicant's long-range development plan.
  • Projects with core administration functions that essentially support only the applicant's ongoing administrative functions and are not related to the proposed project.
  • The support of ongoing social service delivery programs or the expansion, or continuation, of existing social service delivery programs.  This means that ANA will not fund projects that provide or expand ongoing services that involve cash transfers or other material assistance such as food, medicine, child care, or income support to individuals. 
  • Projects that do not further the three interrelated ANA goals of economic development, social development, and cultural preservation. 
  • Projects from consortia of tribes that do not include documentation from each participating consortium member specifying their role and support.  Projects from consortia must have goals and objectives that will encompass the participating communities. ANA will not fund projects by a consortium of tribes that duplicate activities for which participating member tribes also receive funding from ANA. 
  • The purchase of real estate.

 

Application Disqualification Factors

Applications from individuals (including sole proprietorships) and foreign entities are not eligible and will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Award Ceiling Disqualification

Applications that request an award amount that exceeds the Award Ceiling per budget period or per project period ("per project period" refers only to fully funded awards), as stated in Section II. Federal Award Information, will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. This disqualification applies only to the Award Ceiling listed for first 12-month budget period for projects with multiple budget periods. If the project and budget period are the same, the disqualification applies to the Award Ceiling listed for the project period.

Required Electronic Application Submission

ACF requires electronic submission of applications at www.Grants.gov. Paper applications received from applicants that have not been approved for an exemption from required electronic submission will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Applicants that do not have an Internet connection or sufficient computing capacity to upload large documents to the Internet may contact ACF for an exemption that will allow the applicant to submit applications in paper format. Information and the requirements for requesting an exemption from required electronic application submission are found in "ACF Policy for Requesting an Exemption from Electronic Application Submission" at www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/howto#chapter-6


Missing the Application Deadline (Late Applications)

The deadline for electronic application submission is 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date listed in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times. Electronic applications submitted to www.Grants.gov after 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date, as indicated by a dated and time-stamped email from www.Grants.gov, will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. That is, applications submitted to www.Grants.gov, on or after 12:00 a.m., ET, on the day after the due date will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. 

Applications submitted to www.Grants.gov at any time during the open application period, and prior to the due date and time, which fail the www.Grants.gov validation check, will not be received at, or acknowledged by, ACF. 

Each time an application is submitted via www.Grants.gov, the submission will generate a new date and time-stamp email notification. Only those applications with on-time date and time stamps that result in a validated application, which is transmitted to ACF, will be acknowledged.  

The deadline for receipt of paper applications is 4:30 p.m., ET, on the due date listed in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times. Paper applications received after 4:30 p.m., ET, on the due date will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. Paper applications received from applicants that have not received approval of an exemption from required electronic submission will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

 ANA DISQUALIFICATION FACTORS

Assurance of Community Representation on Board of Directors

Applicants other than tribes or Alaska Native villages applying for funding must show that a majority of board members are representative of a Native American community to be served. Applicants must submit documentation that identifies each board member by name and indicates his/her affiliation or relationship to at least one of ANA’s three categories of community representation, which include: (1) members of federally or state-recognized tribes; (2) persons who are recognized by members of the eligible Native American community to be served as having a cultural relationship with that community; or (3) persons considered to be Native American as defined in 45 CFR § 1336.10 and Native American Pacific Islanders as defined in Section 815 of NAPA. The second category of community representation requires a “cultural” relationship defined as lineage, familial, marriage, or other traditional or social connection to the community and not a business or work relationship (e.g. person that owns a business or is employed by an organization that serves the Native community). Applicants that do not include this documentation will be considered non-responsive, and the application will not be considered for competition.

See Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description, Additional Eligibility Documentation.

Public agencies serving native peoples from Guam, American Samoa, or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, must include Assurance of Community Representation from the governing body of the applicant agency, and Tribal Colleges governed by a board that is separate from the governing body of a tribe, must include Assurance of Community Representation from the governing body of the Tribal College, and not from the governing body of the Tribe.  

If an American Indian tribe or Native Alaska village applies for a grant as a non-profit, the Assurance of Community Representation on Board of Directors must be provided. 

Only One Active Award Per CFDA

This disqualification factor applies to all types of eligible applicants:

Organizations can have no more than one active award per CFDA number for an ANA program at any given time. Therefore, organizations with a current ANA grant that is eligible for an NCC award that: 1) will go beyond the start date of the possible new award; and 2) was awarded under the same CFDA number as this FOA, will not have their applications considered for the competition. This disqualification factor is based on the administrative policy that prohibits grantees from having more than one active grant per CFDA number. This disqualification factor does not apply to organizations eligible for an NCC award for the continuation of an ANA grant made under a different CFDA number.

 

Notification of Application Disqualification

Applicants will be notified of a disqualification determination by email or by USPS postal mail within 30 federal business days from the closing date of this FOA.

IV. Application and Submission Information

IV.1. Address to Request Application Package

ANA Operation, Administration and Technical Support Team (OATS)
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
Administration for Native Americans
Mary E. Switzer Memorial Building
330 C Street, SW., 4th Floor
Washington, DC 20201
Phone: (877) 922-9262
Email: anacomments@acf.hhs.gov
URL: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ana/


Electronic Application Submission:
The electronic application submission package is available in the FOA's listing at www.Grants.gov.

Applications in Paper Format:
For applicants that have received an exemption to submit applications in paper format, Standard Forms, assurances, and certifications are available in the "Select Grant Opportunity Package" available in the FOA's Grants.gov Synopsis under the Package tab at www.Grants.gov. See Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission if applicants do not have an Internet connection or sufficient computing capacity to upload large documents (files) to www.Grants.gov.

Federal Relay Service:
Hearing-impaired and speech-impaired callers may contact the Federal Relay Service (FedRelay) for assistance at www.gsa.gov/fedrelay.

IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission

IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission

FORMATTING APPLICATION SUBMISSIONS


Authorized Organizational Representative (AOR)
AOR is the designated representative of the applicant/recipient organization with authority to act on the organization’s behalf in matters related to the award and administration of grants. In signing a grant application, this individual agrees that the organization will assume the obligations imposed by applicable Federal statutes and regulations and other terms and conditions of the award, including any assurances, if a grant is awarded.

Point of Contact
In addition to the AOR, a point of contact on matters involving the application must also be identified on the SF-424.  The point of contact, known as the Project Director or Principal Investigator, should not be identical to the person identified as the AOR.  The point of contact should also be an employee of the applicant organization and not a contractor, such as a grant writer. The point of contact must be available to answer any questions pertaining to the application.


Application Checklist
Applicants may refer to Section VIII. Other Information for a checklist of application requirements that may be used in developing and organizing application materials. Details concerning acknowledgment of received applications are available in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times of this announcement.

Accepted Font Style
Applications must be in Times New Roman (TNR), 12-point font, except for footnotes, which may be TNR 10-point font.

English Language
Applications must be submitted in the English language and must be in the terms of United States (U.S.) dollars. If applications are submitted using another currency, ACF will convert the foreign currency to U.S. currency using the date of receipt of the application to determine the rate of exchange.

Page Limitations
Applicants must observe the page limitation(s) listed under “Page Limitations and Content for All Application Submission Formats:" Page limitation(s) do not include Standard Forms (SFs), OMB-approved forms, including the ANA Objective Workplan (OWP), required assurances and certifications.


All applications must be double-spaced and in Times New Roman, 12-point font.  An application that exceeds the cited page limitation for double-spaced pages will have the extra pages removed and the removed pages will not be reviewed.

Application Elements Exempted from Double-Spacing Requirements
The following elements of the application submission are exempt from the double-spacing requirements and may be single-spaced: the one-page Project Summary/Abstract, required Assurances and Certifications, required SFs, required OMB-approved forms, resumes, logic models, proof of legal status/non-profit status, third-party agreements, letters of support, footnotes, tables, the line-item budget and/or the budget justification.

Adherence to FOA Formatting, Font, and Page Limitation Requirements
Applications that fail to adhere to formatting, font, and page limitation requirements will be adjusted by the removal of page(s) from the application. Pages will be removed before the objective review. The removed page(s) will not be made available to reviewers.

In instances where formatting and font requirements are not adhered to, ACF uses a formula to determine the actual number of pages to be removed. The formula counts the number of characters an applicant uses when following the instructions and using 12-point TNR and compares the resulting number with that of the submitted application. For example, an applicant using TNR, 11-point font, with 1-inch margins all around, and single-spacing, would have an additional 26 lines, or 1500 characters, which is equal to 4/5 of an additional page. Extra pages resulting from this formula will be removed and will not be reviewed.

Applications that have more than one scanned page of a document on a single page will have the page(s) removed from the review. For applicants that submit paper applications, double-sided pages will be counted as two pages. When the maximum allowed number of pages is reached, excess pages will be removed and will not be made available to reviewers.

Page limitations are identical for electronically-submitted and paper format application submissions.

NOTE: Applicants failing to adhere to formatting, font, and page limitation requirements will receive a letter from ACF notifying them that their application was amended. The letter will be sent after awards have been issued and will specify the reason(s) for removal of page(s).

Corrections/Updates to Submitted Applications
When applicants make revisions to a previously submitted application, ACF will accept only the last on-time application for pre-review under the Application Disqualification Factors. The Application Disqualification Factors determine the application's acceptance for competitive review. See Section III.3. Application Disqualification Factors and Section IV.2. Application Submission Options.

Copies Required
Applicants must submit one complete copy of the application package electronically. Applicants submitting electronic applications need not provide additional copies of their application package. Applicants submitting applications in paper format must submit one original and two copies of the complete application, including all Standard Forms and OMB-approved forms. The original copy must have original signatures.

Signatures
Applicants submitting electronic applications must follow the registration and application submission instructions provided at www.Grants.gov. The original of a paper format application must include original signatures.

Accepted Application Format
With the exception of the required Standard Forms (SFs) and OMB-approved forms, all application materials must be formatted so that they are 8 ½" x 11" white paper with 1-inch margins all around. If possible, applicants are encouraged to include page numbers for each page within the application.

ACF generally does not encourage submission of scanned documents as they tend to have reduced clarity and readability.  If documents must be scanned, the font size on any scanned documents must be large enough so that it is readable. Documents must be scanned page-for-page, meaning that applicants may not scan more than one page of a document onto a single page.

PAGE LIMITATIONS AND CONTENT FOR ALL APPLICATION SUBMISSION FORMATS:

ANA has implemented a page limit of 150 total pages for applications submitted in response to this FOA. The page limitation excludes the required forms, assurances, and certifications listed in this section. The one-page Project Summary/Abstract and Business Plans are also excluded from the page limitation.

Required Application Elements to be included in File One :

  • Table of Contents
  • Project Summary/Abstract (limited to one single-spaced page)
  • Project Description
    • Expected Outcomes
      • Long Term Community Goal
      • Current Community Condition
      • Project Goal
      • Objective(s)

      •  

        Outcome(s)
      • Indicator(s)

      •  

        Outputs
      • Outcome Tracking Strategy
      • Outcome Tracker
    • Approach
      • Planning, Readiness, and Implementation Strategy
      • Community-Based Strategy
      • Personnel and Partnerships
      • Geographic Location
      • Organizational Capacity
      • Protection of Sensitive and Confidential Information
      • Plan for Oversight of Federal Award Funds
  • Objective Work Plan
  • Project Budget and Budget Justification
    • Line Item Budget
    • Narrative Budget Justification

Required Application Elements to be included in File Two

  • Required Governing Body Documentation
  • Assurance of Community Representation on Board of Directors, based on type of applicant entity
  • Maintenance of Effort Certification (MOE)
  • Legal Status of Applicant Entity, if applicable
  • Commitment of Non-federal resources
  • Job Descriptions
  • Resumes
  • Indirect Cost Rate Agreement, if applicable
  • Letters of Support
  • Third Party Agreements, if applicable
  • Business Plan, if applicable
  • Other attachments, if necessary

The OWP is a required application element. The OWP is an OMB-approved form and is not considered to be an additional file. 

For paper format application submissions, the Standard Forms (SFs); other forms approved by OMB, including the ANA OWP, and required certifications and assurances must be included in the application package.

ELECTRONIC APPLICATION SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:

Applicants are required to submit their applications electronically unless they have requested and received an exemption that will allow submission in paper format. See Section IV.2. Application Submission Options for information about requesting an exemptionElectronic applications will only be accepted via www.Grants.gov. ACF will not accept applications submitted via email or via facsimile.

Each applicant is required to upload ONLY two electronic files, excluding SFs and OMB-approved forms.


File One: Must contain the entire Project Description, and the Budget and Budget Justification (including a line-item budget and budget narrative).

File Two: Must contain all documents required in the Appendices.

Adherence to the Two-File Requirement
No more than two files will be accepted for the review. Applications with additional files will be amended and files will be removed from the review. SFs and OMB-approved forms will not be considered additional files.

Application Upload Requirements
ACF strongly recommends that electronic applications be uploaded as Portable Document Files (PDFs). One file must contain the entire Project Description and Budget Justification; the other file must contain all documents required in the Appendices. Details on the content of each of the two files, as well as page limitations, are listed earlier in this section.

To adhere to the two-file requirement, applicants may need to convert and/or merge documents together using a PDF converter software. Many recent version of Microsoft Office include the ability to save documents to the PDF format without need of additional software. Applicants using Adobe Professional software suite will be able to merge these documents together. ACF recommends merging documents electronically rather than scanning multiple documents into one document manually, as scanned documents may have reduced clarity and readability.

Applicants must ensure that the version of Adobe Professional they are using is compatible with Grants.gov. To verify Adobe software compatibility please go to Grants.gov and click on "Support" at the top bar menu and select "Adobe Software Compatibility", which is listed under the topic "Online Answers." The Adobe verification process allows applicants to test their version of the software by opening a test application package. Grants.gov also includes guidance on how to download a supported version of Adobe, as well as troubleshooting instructions if an applicant is unable to open the test application package.

The Adobe Software Compatibility page located on Grants.gov also provides guidance for applicants that have received error messages while attempting to save an application package. It also addresses local network and/or computer security settings and the impact this has on use of Adobe software.

Required Standard Forms (SFs) and OMB-approved Forms

Standard Forms (SFs) and OMB-approved forms, such as the SF-424 application and budget forms and the SF-P/PSL (Project/Performance Site Location), and the OMB-approved ANA Objective Work Plan (OWP) form, are uploaded separately at Grants.gov. These forms are submitted separately from the other application files at Grants.gov and are not subject to the page limitations. See Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications for the listing of required Standard Forms, OMB-approved forms, and required assurances and certifications.

Naming Application Submission Files
Carefully observe the file naming conventions required by www.Grants.gov. Limit file names to 50 characters (characters and spaces). Special fonts and characters of Native American languages should not be used to name files or other uploaded documents of the application. Special characters that are allowed under Grants.gov’s naming conventions, and are accommodated by ACF’s systems, are listed in the instructions available in the Download Application Package at Grants.gov. Please also see www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/submitting-utf-8-special-characters.html. File names that exceed 50 characters and spaces, and/or use special characters other than those accepted by Grants.gov, will not be accepted by Grants.gov. Those applications will not be received by ACF. Failure to follow the file naming conventions will cause a validation error when the application is submitted on Grants.gov. If rejected, the file name should be corrected by the applicant and resubmitted to Grants.gov prior to the application submission deadline.

Use only file formats supported by ACF
It is critical that applicants submit applications using only the supported file formats listed here. While ACF supports all of the following file formats, we strongly recommend that files are uploaded as PDF documents. Documents in file formats that are not supported by ACF will be removed from the application and will not be used in the competitive review. This may make the application incomplete and ACF will not make any awards based on an incomplete application.

ACF supports the following file formats:

  • Adobe PDF – Portable Document Format (.pdf)
  • Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx)
  • Microsoft Excel (.xls or .xlsx)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint (.ppt)
  • Corel WordPerfect (.wpd)
  • Image Formats (.JPG, .GIF, .TIFF, or .BMP only)

Do Not Encrypt or Password-Protect the Electronic Application Files
If ACF cannot access submitted electronic files because they have been encrypted or password protected, the affected file will be removed from the application and will not be reviewed. This removal may make the application incomplete and ACF will not make awards based on an incomplete application.


PAPER APPLICATION SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:

The following requirements are only applicable to applications submitted in paper format. Applicants must receive an exemption from ACF in order for a paper format application to be accepted for review. See Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission later in this section under Application Submission Options for more information.

Format Requirements for Paper Applications
All copies of mailed or hand-delivered paper applications must be submitted in a single package. If an applicant is submitting multiple applications under a single FOA, or multiple applications under separate FOAs, each application submission must be packaged separately. The package(s) must be clearly labeled for the specific FOA it addresses by FOA title and by Funding Opportunity Number (FON). The order of application elements in paper format submissions must adhere to the sequence described under the “Page Limitations and Content for All Application Submission Formats” section.  The order is also illustrated by the Section VIII. Checklist.


Because each application will be duplicated, do not use or include separate covers, binders, clips, tabs, plastic inserts, maps, brochures, or any other items that cannot be processed easily on a photocopy machine with an automatic feed. Do not bind, clip, staple, or fasten in any way separate sections of the application. Applicants are advised that the copies of the application submitted, not the original, will be reproduced by the federal government for review. All application materials must be one-sided for duplication purposes.  All pages in the application submission must be sequentially numbered.

Addresses for Submission of Paper Applications

See Section IV.7. Other Submission Requirements for addresses for paper format application submissions.

Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications


Applicants seeking grant or cooperative agreement awards under this announcement must submit the listed Standard Forms (SFs), assurances, and certifications with the application.
All required Standard Forms, assurances, and certifications are available in the Application Package posted for this FOA at www.Grants.gov.

 

Forms / Assurances / Certifications Submission Requirement Notes / Description

Protective of Sensitive and/or Confidential Information

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.

Submission due by the application due date found in Overview and Section IV.3.

Maintenance of Effort (MOE) Certification

A sample of a standard Maintenance of Effort (MOE) certification is available in the application instructions for this FOA at www​.grant​s​.gov​. Applicants self-certify their maintenance of effort. The MOE should be on the applicant organization's letterhead. Submission is required for all applicants under this FOA. See Section IV.2. Formatting Application Submissions for instructions on its placement in the application submission.

Required for all applications.

SF-LLL - Disclosure of Lobbying Activities

If submission of this form is applicable, it is due at the time of application.  If it is not available at the time of application, it may also be submitted prior to the award of a grant.

If any funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a member of Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan, the applicant shall complete and submit the SF-LLL, "Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying," in accordance with its instructions.

SF-424A - Budget Information - Non- Construction Programs and SF-424B - Assurances - Non- Construction Programs

Submission is required for all applicants when applying for a non-construction project. Standard Forms must be used. Forms must be submitted by the application due date.

By signing and submitting the SF-424B, applicants are making the appropriate certification of their compliance with all Federal statutes relating to nondiscrimination.

Required for all applications when applying for a non-construction project. 

Certification Regarding Lobbying
(Grants.gov Lobbying Form)

Submission required of all applicants with the application package.  If it is not submitted with the application package, it must be submitted prior to the award of a grant.

Submission of the certification is required for all applicants.

SF-424 - Application for Federal Assistance

Submission is required for all applicants by the application due date.

Required for all applications.

Unique Entity Identifier (DUNS) and Systems for Award Management (SAM) registration.

Required of all applicants. To obtain a DUNS number, go to http​://fedgo​v​.dnb​.com​/ webfo​rm​

Active registration at the Systems Award Management (SAM) website must be maintained throughout the application and project award period.

SAM registration is available at 
http​://www​.sam​.gov​.

See Section IV.3. Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM) for more information.

ANA Objective Work Plan (OWP) 

Submission is required for all applicants by the application due date.

The OWP is a required OMB-approved form that serves as a blueprint for project implementation. The OWP form and its instructions are available in the FOA's Grant Application Package at www​.grant​s​.gov​

 

SF-Project/Performance Site Location(s) (SF-P/PSL)

Submission is required for all applicants by the application due date.

Required for all applications. In the SF-P/PSL, applicants must cite their primary location and up to 29 additional performance sites.

Mandatory Grant Disclosure

All applicants and recipients are required to submit, in writing, to the awarding agency and to the HHS Office of the Inspector General (OIG), all information related to violations of federal criminal law involving fraud, bribery, or gratuity violations potentially affecting the federal award. (Mandatory Disclosures, 45 CFR 75.113)

Disclosures must be sent in writing to:

The Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Grants Management, ATTN: Grants Management Specialist, 330 C Street, SW., Switzer Building, Corridor 3200, Washington, DC 20201

And to:

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General, ATTN: Mandatory Grant Disclosures, Intake Coordinator, 330 Independence Avenue, SW., Cohen Building, Room 5527, Washington, DC 20201

Fax: (202) 205-0604 (Include “Mandatory Grant Disclosures” in subject line) or
Email: MandatoryGranteeDisclosures@oig.hhs.gov


Non-Federal Reviewers

Since ACF will be using non-federal reviewers in the review process, applicants have the option of omitting from the application copies (not the original) specific salary rates or amounts for individuals specified in the application budget as well as Social Security Numbers, if otherwise required for individuals. The copies may include summary salary information. If applicants are submitting their application electronically, ACF will omit the same specific salary rate information from copies made for use during the review and selection process.
    The Project Description

    The Project Description

The Project Description Overview

Purpose

The project description provides the majority of information by which an application is evaluated and ranked in competition with other applications for available assistance.  It should address the activity for which federal funds are being requested, and should be consistent with the goals and objectives of the program as described in Section I. Program Description.  Supporting documents should be included where they can present information clearly and succinctly.  When appropriate, applicants should cite the evaluation criteria that are relevant to specific components of their project description.   Awarding offices use this and other information in making their funding recommendations.  It is important, therefore, that this information be included in the application in a manner that is clear and complete.

General Expectations and Instructions

Applicants should develop project descriptions that focus on outcomes and convey strategies for achieving intended performance. Project descriptions are evaluated on the basis of substance and measurable outcomes, not length. Extensive exhibits are not required. Cross-referencing should be used rather than repetition. Supporting information concerning activities that will not be directly funded by the grant or information that does not directly pertain to an integral part of the grant-funded activity should be placed in an appendix.

Introduction

Applicants must prepare the project description statement in accordance with the following instructions while being aware of the specified evaluation criteria in Section V.1. Criteria.  The text options give a broad overview of what the project description should include while the evaluation criteria identify the measures that will be used to evaluate applications.

Table of Contents

List the contents of the application including corresponding page numbers. The table of contents must be single spaced and will be counted against the total page limitations.

Project Summary/Abstract

Provide a summary of the application’s project description. The summary must be clear, accurate, concise, and without reference to other parts of the application. The abstract must include a brief description of the proposed grant project including the needs to be addressed, the proposed services, and the population group(s) to be served. 

Please place the following at the top of the abstract: 

  • Project Title
  • Applicant Name
  • Address
  • Contact Phone Numbers (Voice, Fax)
  • E-Mail Address
  • Web Site Address, if applicable 

The project abstract must be single-spaced, in Times New Roman 12-point font, and limited to one page in length. Additional pages will be removed and will not be reviewed.

Expected Outcomes

Identify the outcomes to be derived from the project.  Outcomes should relate to the overall goals of the project as described in Section I. Program Description. If research is part of the proposed work, outcomes must include hypothesized results and implications of the proposed research.

Expected Outcomes are established and quantified through the ANA project framework, introduced in Section I. Program Description.  The ANA project framework includes a long-term community goal, current community condition, project goal, objectives, outcomes, indicators, and outputs.  

ANA Project Framework

Provide the following information related to expected outcomes and the ANA project framework:

Long-Term Community Goal: ANA requires that project outcomes relate to a long-term community goal that has been identified through community input such as a survey, meetings, or a strategic plan. Achievement of the long-term community goal should be the basis for the proposed project planning.

Identify a long-term community goal to frame the relevance of the project within the community. Describe how the long-term community goal was identified.

Example of Long-term Community Goal: Youth in our community are living healthy lifestyles: spiritually, physically and emotionally

Current Community Condition:

Describe a specific and current community condition that will be addressed by the project. The current community condition should include information that provides a baseline condition for the project, so that the achievement of the project goal and outcomes can be used to show a change in the condition described. Avoid using “lack of” or “need for” statements in describing the condition.  Use data to describe the baseline status of the condition to be addressed. 

Include information to fully identify the target population, demonstrate knowledge about project participants and beneficiaries, and describe community involvement in identifying and defining the current community condition to be addressed by the project. Supporting details may include data or specific circumstances related to target beneficiaries, information about current resources or services available to the target population, and/or other demographic information related to project participants and beneficiaries. Information included in this section should be limited to details that directly relate to the purpose of both the SEDS Program and project goal.

Example of focus for Current Community Condition: According to the National Youth Fitness survey administered by the Center for Disease Control, our high school youth (13-18) are well below the national average for being physically fit due to sedentary lifestyles, poor nutrition, and high risk behaviors. Currently, our youth do not have access to culturally-based healthy lifestyle promotion programming, especially programming that focuses on improving health in a holistic way.

Project Goal: The project goal is a statement describing what is to be achieved by the project’s implementation and/or what role the project will play in addressing the current community condition. It can describe a reduction or resolution of a negative condition, or it can describe an expanded capacity to successfully address the current community condition.  The project goal must be supported by the project’s expected outcomes.

Identify a project goal that states what will be achieved by the project and describe how the project goal will address the current community condition. 

Example Project Goal: Increase healthy lifestyle choices among the youth in our community through culturally-based, holistic, health, promotion programming offered in an after-school format.

Objectives: ANA permits a maximum of three project objectives for the entire project period. The project objectives are required  to quantify tangible achievements to be completed by the project. Project objective(s) must relate to a primary outcome that addresses the current community condition. Each objective must include an indicator, as well as a targeted achievement for the indicator. The logical process for how all of these components interact should be clearly traceable.

To fully quantify the deliverable, each objective must include the following four components, also known as TTIP:

  • Timeline: a time by which the objective will be achieved
  • Target: a measurement for the intended amount of change
  • Indicator: a measurable sign that something has been done or been achieved
  • Population: a specific group on which the program is intending to focus

Provide up to three objectives for the proposed project. The order of these components in each objective is not important as long as each is included. 

 Example Objective: By the end of 36 months (timeline), there will be a 50 percent increase (target) in fitness levels (indicator) of our high school students ages 13-18 (population) who complete the healthy lifestyles program.

Outcome(s): Outcome(s) are measurable changes that result from the project, which can occur at the beneficiary, staff, governmental/organizational, or community-level. There is the potential for a project to achieve multiple outcomes; however, ANA requires one outcome per objective. Outcomes are further defined within the ANA project framework by the indicator and means of measurement. 

Describe the primary outcome for each objective to identify the most significant change the objective seeks to create by the end of the project. Information within the application should demonstrate a clear connection between each outcome and the current community condition, project goal and SEDS program purpose as described in Section I. Program Description. 

Example Outcome:  Our community high school students will adopt behavioral changes leading to healthier lifestyles.

Indicator: An indicator is an observable and measurable characteristic that can be used to show the progress project is making toward achieving a specific outcome. Indicators are included in the project objective and must describe what will be changed by the objective’s outcome. 

Each project should have a specific indicator for each objective’s outcome. The means of measurement (included in the outcome tracking strategy) identifies the method that will be used to identify changes to the indicator, and the target identifies a specific level of achievement. 

Clearly identify an indicator for each objective’s outcome that can be tied to measuring progress toward achieving the outcome. 

Example Indicator:  Fitness levels

Outputs: Outputs are tangible products or services that result from actions taken to achieve project objectives. Outputs are critical to identifying the means for achieving project objectives by pinpointing what the project will produce or complete in order to accomplish objectives. Outputs also help establish benchmarks that can be used to monitor progress toward achieving project objectives. Milestone activities included in the OWP are the steps that must be taken to achieve outputs. 

Describe the outputs that will result from carrying out the project objectives. 

Example Outputs: Tailored fitness plans created by all participants, 12 monthly nutrition workshops completed per year, 12 monthly group athletic events completed per year

Outcome Tracking Strategy: The outcome tracking strategy consists of narrative and an outcome tracker. The narrative must describe a relevant and accurate means for measuring each project objective and indicator, and include details to describe who, when, and how the project will collect, manage, and assess data. The narrative must also identify data management systems, and/or the development or improvement of a data management system to collect and assess project data. 

Describe the outcome tracking strategy for the proposed project. Include information to identify data collection tools and processes, how data will be assessed, and any system that will be used and/or developed to manage data.

Outcome Tracker: An outcome tracker must be developed for each project objective. The outcome tracker aligns information from the project framework with a means for measurement and annual targets for achievement. The outcome tracker is designed to support project staff in monitoring progress during project implementation.  

Provide an outcome tracker for each project objective that includes the project goal, objective, primary outcome, indicator, and means for measuring the indicator. Each indicator must be measured using the same method throughout project implementation. The outcome tracker must also identify benchmarks for the indicator at the following points in time: baseline (beginning of project), end of each project year, and 3-year post project. (For example, a 3-year project would include baseline, end of project year 1, end of project year 2, end of project period, and 3-year post project benchmarks), and list project outputs associated with each objective. The 3-year target is the anticipated data point for three years after the grant funding has ended. This will measure the intended growth or sustainability of the desired change.

See Appendix C, Outcome Tracker for an example on how to format the Outcome Tracker.

Approach

Outline a plan of action that describes the scope and detail of how the proposed project will be accomplished.  Applicants must account for all functions or activities identified in the application. Describe any design or technological innovations, reductions in cost or time, or extraordinary social and/or community involvement in the project. Provide a list of organizations, cooperating entities, consultants, or other key individuals that will work on the project, along with a short description of the nature of their effort or contribution.

Cite potential obstacles and challenges to accomplishing project goals and explain strategies that will be used to address these challenges.

The project approach should provide information to describe project planning and implementation, and include details that demonstrate a community-based strategy for implementation. The approach should also provide a full description of the project staffing plan and details about partnerships. Lastly, the approach includes the OWP that was introduced in Section I. Program Description.  

Planning, Readiness, and Implementation Strategy

Applications must demonstrate planning and readiness to implement the proposed project, and provide details to describe the strategy for project implementation. Information should identify all resources and preparation needed to implement project activities and indicate existing resources versus resources that are needed. Where resources are needed, the application should include the plan to secure them. State whether or not a license or permit is needed.  If so, describe how or when it will be obtained. The implementation strategy should expand on and provide more information, as needed, on “milestone activities” presented in the OWP. The application should also include information to identify obstacles and challenges that could hinder project implementation and contingency plans that show how the applicant will minimize potential interruption. (See Appendix B. Definitions, Contingency Plan.)

Provide information to demonstrate planning, readiness, and the implementation strategy for the proposed project. 

Discuss what measures will be taken to ensure that the positive outcomes achieved by the project will be sustained.  Additionally, describe what measures will be taken to ensure programmatic sustainability, if applicable.

Community-Based Strategy 

ANA emphasizes projects that are designed around community-based priorities for self-sufficiency. The community-based strategy should describe the applicant organization’s connection to the community and project beneficiaries being served, identify why the project objectives and outcomes are important to the community being served, and describe how the community members were involved in identifying the project as a priority for the community. Information must also be provided to detail the time and dedication needed on behalf of community members and project participants in order to successfully implement project activities. Recruitment and retention strategies must be provided for key participants.  The community-based strategy should also demonstrate how community strengths and resources will be used to support project implementation, how the project will take advantage of opportunities to use local resources and/or increase local capacity and account for how benefits will be sustained within the community by community members once the project has ended. 

Provide information to demonstrate a community-based strategy for project implementation.  Documentation could include stakeholder meeting agendas or sign-in sheets, surveys, focus groups, etc.

 

Personnel and Partnerships

It is vital to the success of any project that key personnel are qualified and available. Successful applicants must fully plan for project staffing, including recruitment, retention, and contingencies for key staff positons.

A detailed project staffing plan should be included that identifies staff responsibilities and project personnel, with sufficient qualifications to fulfill those responsibilities (for example, required licensing, professional experience, subject matter expertise, etc.). Organizations that are selected for funding are required to comply with applicable tribal, state, and federal  financial policies and procedures that include proper checks and balances when authorizing expenditures and drawing down grant funds. The staffing plan should address these requirements and plan for financial management and the staff’s time and qualifications for implementing activities described in the outcome tracking strategy.

If new staff members are to be hired, applicants should describe the recruitment and hiring process. Common challenges include identification and retention of qualified staff, policies and procedures that delays hiring, etc. Applicants must describe accessibility of potential candidates, and include contingency plans to describe how the project will progress until vacant positions are filled.

Applicants must also demonstrate qualifications for key partnerships and consultants that are critical to the implementation of project activities. Through impact evaluations, ANA has identified that the most successful projects either maintain firm commitments and involvement from key partnerships or include contingency plans for a lack of commitment and involvement. Therefore, if partnerships are proposed, applicants must describe the role of the partner organization and staff, including relevant expertise and experience, as well as clear roles for and responsibilities for project implementation. If formal agreements have not been established at the time of application, the applicant must describe plans to finalize partnership agreements, including firm commitments and contingency plans for these partners.

Provide details about the staffing plan and key partnerships. Ensure the AOR and PI/PD positions have been identified as described in Section I. Program Description and that financial management and compliance have been accounted for. Include recruitment, retention, and contingency plans as applicable. For partnerships, describe how communication and responsibilities will be maintained, what qualifications are needed, and how partnerships will be maintained.

 

Objective Work Plan 

The OWP is a standalone document that mirrors the project’s implementation plan and identifies all the key elements of the project description (or ANA project framework) including the community condition, project goal, objectives, milestone activities, outputs and outcomes, staff responsible, and time-frame for the completion of each activity. Key project elements in the OWP should mirror those stated in the project narrative and support consistency throughout the application. The OWP serves as a blueprint to be used both in the project’s implementation and its evaluation. The OWP provides fundamental information on how (through key activities), when (by established timeframes for key activities), and by whom (with assigned of responsibility for activity completion) the project will be implemented.

Include a separate OWP form for each project objective, per budget period. The budget period for this FOA begins 9/30, and ends 9/29, for each year of the project period.

A maximum of 25 milestone activities should be listed on each OWP form (25 milestone activities for each year of an objective). Milestone activities are key activities needed to successfully achieve each objective.

ANA Administrative Activities should be included under one objective for each year of project implementation. They should be placed after all milestone activities. (See OWP instructions for required ANA Administrative Activities)

The OWP form and its instructions are available in the FOA's Grant Application Package at www​.grant​s​.gov​ and on the Grants.gov Forms/SF-424 Family page at http​://www​.grant​s​.gov​/web​/grant​s​/forms​/sf​-424​- famil​y​.html​.

Geographic Location

Describe the precise location of the project and boundaries of the area to be served by the proposed project.

Legal Status of Applicant Entity
Non-profit organizations applying for funding are required to submit proof of their non-profit status. Proof of non-profit status is any one of the following:
  • A reference to the applicant organization's listing in the IRS's most recent list of tax-exempt organizations described in the IRS Code.
  • A copy of a currently valid IRS tax-exemption certificate.
  • A statement from a state taxing body, state attorney general, or other appropriate state official certifying that the applicant organization has non-profit status and that none of the net earnings accrue to any private shareholders or individuals.
  • A certified copy of the organization's certificate of incorporation or similar document that clearly establishes non-profit status.
  • Any of the items in the subparagraphs immediately above for a state or national parent organization and a statement signed by the parent organization that the applicant organization is a local non-profit affiliate.

Unless directed otherwise, applicants must include proof of non-profit status in the Appendices file of the electronic application submission.


Additional Eligibility Documentation

Applicants must provide the additional, required documentation, or required credentials, to support eligibility for an award, as described in Section III. Eligibility Information of this announcement:

Required Governing Body Documentation

All applicants must submit documentation demonstrating that the governing body of the organization on whose behalf the application is submitted approves the application’s submission to ANA for the current grant competition period. Pursuant to 45 CFR §1336.33, if the applicant is a tribally authorized component or division of a tribal government, the applicant must also include documentation demonstrating that the governing body of the tribe approves the application’s submission to ANA for the current competition period.  Tribal Colleges must include governing body documentation from the governing body of the college, and not from the governing body of the tribe. All documentation submitted must be signed and dated by an official of the governing body.  In signing the application, the governing body agrees that the applicant organization will assume the obligation imposed by applicable federal regulations and other terms and conditions of the award, including any assurances, if the grant is awarded. Written board resolutions, meeting minutes from the governing body, and/or letters from the authorizing official reflecting approval are acceptable documentation depending on what is appropriate for the applicant’s governance structure.  This documentation should be included with the applicant's submission to ANA. Without ANA’s receipt of signed and dated documentation prior to the start of the award of grant funds, the applicant’s project cannot be approved.

Assurance of Community Representation on Board of Directors (this applies only to applicants that are not tribes or Native Alaska villages).

Organizations applying for funding must show that a majority of board members are representative of the community to be served. Non-profit organizations are required to submit documentation that identifies each board member by name and indicates his/her affiliation or relationship to at least one of ANA's three categories of community representation, which include: (1) members of federally or state-recognized tribes; (2) persons who are recognized by the eligible community to be served as having a cultural relationship with that community; or (3) persons considered to be Native American as defined in 45 CFR §1336.10 and Native American Pacific Islanders as defined in Section 815 of NAPA. The second category of community representation requires a “cultural” relationship defined as lineage, familial, marriage, or other traditional or social connection to the community and not a business or work relationship (e.g. person that owns a business or is employed by an organization that serve the Native community.  Applicants that do not include this documentation at the time of application submission will be considered non-responsive, and the application will not be considered for competition. Refer to Section III.3. Eligibility Information, Other, ANA Disqualification Factors for more information.

Business Plan

When federal grant funds will be used to support a business operation, provide a business plan. The business plan shall include:


  • An executive summary
  • A description of the industry
  • A description of the products or services to be produced, sold, or marketed
  • Market research
  • A marketing plan
  • An operational plan
  • An assessment of risks and assumptions
  • Financial statements (if already in operation)
  • Forecasted balance sheet, operational statements (including project operational costs), and cash flow projections

Organizational Capacity

Provide the following information on the applicant organization and, if applicable, on any cooperating partners:

  • Organizational charts;
  • Resumes (no more than two single-spaced pages in length);
  • List of Board of Directors;
  • Evidence that the applicant organization, and any partnering organizations, have relevant experience and expertise with administration, development, implementation, management, and evaluation of programs similar to that offered under this announcement;
  • Evidence that each participating organization, including partners and/or subcontractors, possess the organizational capability to fulfill their role(s) and function(s) effectively;
  • Job descriptions for each vacant key position.
Protection of Sensitive and/or Confidential Information

If any confidential or sensitive information will be collected during the course of the project, whether from staff (e.g., background investigations) or project participants and/or project beneficiaries, provide a description of the methods that will be used to ensure that confidential and/or sensitive information is properly handled and safeguarded. Also provide a plan for the disposition of such information at the end of the project period.

Third-Party Agreements

Third-party agreements include Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) and Letters of Commitment. General letters of support are not considered to be third-party agreements. Third-party agreements must clearly describe the project activities and support to which the third party is committing.  Third-party agreements must be signed by the person in the third-party organization with the authority to make such commitments on behalf of their organization.

Provide written and signed agreements between grantees and subgrantees, or subcontractors, or other cooperating entities. These agreements must detail the scope of work to be performed, work schedules, remuneration, and other terms and conditions that structure or define the relationship.
Collaboration/consortia applicants must provide letters of commitment or MOU identifying the primary applicant that is responsible for administering the grant. The primary applicant must provide documentation of the commitments made by partnering organizations and describe in detail their roles and responsibilities as partners in the collaboration/consortia.
Letters of Support

Provide statements from community, public, and commercial leaders that support the project proposed for funding.  All submissions must be included in the application package.

Plan for Oversight of Federal Award Funds

Provide a plan describing how oversight of federal funds will be ensured and how grant activities and partner(s) will adhere to applicable federal and programmatic regulations. Applicants must identify staff that will be responsible for maintaining oversight of program activities, staff, and partner(s). Applicants must describe procedures and policies used to oversee staff and/or partners/contractors.

Describe organizational records systems that relate financial data to performance data by identifying the source and application of federal funds so that they demonstrate effective control over and accountability for funds, compare outlays with budget amounts, and provide accounting records supported by source documentation.

The Project Budget and Budget Justification

All applicants are required to submit a project budget and budget justification with their application. The project budget is entered on the Budget Information Standard Form, either SF-424A or SF-424C, according to the directions provided with the SFs. The budget justification consists of a budget narrative and a line-item budget detail that includes detailed calculations for "object class categories" identified on the Budget Information Standard Form. Applicants must indicate the method they are selecting for their indirect cost rate.  See Indirect Charges for further information. 

Project budget calculations must include estimation methods, quantities, unit costs, and other similar quantitative detail sufficient for the calculation to be duplicated. If matching or cost sharing is a requirement, applicants must include a detailed listing of any funding sources identified in Block 18 of the SF-424 (Application for Federal Assistance). See the table in Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications listing the appropriate budget forms to use in this application.

Special Note: The Department of Defense and Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Act, 2019 and Continuing Appropriations Act, 2019, (Division B, Title II, Sec. 202), limits the salary amount that may be awarded and charged to ACF grants and cooperative agreements. Award funds issued under this announcement may not be used to pay the salary of an individual at a rate in excess of Executive Level II. The Executive Level II salary of the "Rates of Pay for the Executive Schedule" is $189,600. This amount reflects an individual's base salary exclusive of fringe benefits and any income that an individual may be permitted to earn outside of the duties of the applicant organization. This salary limitation also applies to subawards and subcontracts under an ACF grant or cooperative agreement.

 

Provide a budget using the 424A and/or 424C, as applicable, for each year of the proposed project. Provide a budget justification, which includes a budget narrative and a line-item detail, for each year of the proposed project. The budget narrative should describe how the categorical costs are derived. Discuss the necessity, reasonableness, and allocation of the proposed costs.

Applicants are encouraged to use the ANA Application Toolkit for the templates for the Budget and Budget Justification sections of their application.

See Section VIII. Other Information, Reference Websites.

Post Award Training

Applicants must include costs in the budget to attend post-award training during the first year of project implementation, which is held in each region. For Alaska, this is usually held in Anchorage. Post-award training is designed to provide newly awarded ANA grantees with information on how to effectively administer, manage, track and report their ANA-funded projects. This is a mandatory training only in the first budget period for the project director and financial administrator to attend. Applicants should follow their own travel policies to budget for this 2-day meeting; however, an average amount is $3,000, depending on your location. 

Annual ANA Grantee Meeting

Applicants must include costs in the budget for two individuals to attend an annual ANA-sponsored grantee meeting. Each year, ANA conducts a conference with T/TA workshops and support. However, every other year, this meeting is held in coordination with the ACF Native American grantee meeting.  Attendance at the annual grantee meeting is a requirement of the grant and should be included in each year of the proposed projects budget. The meeting is typically held in the Washington, DC, area, and it must be attended by two individuals who are directly working on the project. Applicants should follow their own travel policies to budget for this 3-day meeting that is held nationally. 

See Appendix A, Suggested Travel costs for additional information. 

ANA will support recipients with evaluation strategies; therefore, the budget should not include funds to support external evaluations.

General

Use the following guidelines for preparing the budget and budget justification.  When a match or cost share is required, both federal and non-federal resources must be detailed and justified in the budget and budget narrative justification. "Federal resources" refers only to the ACF grant funds for which the applicant is applying. “Non-federal resources” are all other non-ACF federal and non-federal resources. It is suggested that budget amounts and computations be presented in a columnar format:  first column, object class categories; second column, federal budget; next column(s), non-federal budget(s); and last column, total budget. The budget justification should be in a narrative form.

 

Personnel

Description:  Costs of employee salaries and wages.

Justification: Identify the project director or principal investigator, if known at the time of application.  For each staff person provide:  the title; time commitment to the project in months; time commitment to the project as a percentage or full-time equivalent: annual salary; grant salary; wage rates; etc.  Do not include the costs of consultants, personnel costs of delegate agencies, or of specific project(s) and/or businesses to be financed by the applicant. Contractors and consultants should not be placed under this category.

Fringe Benefits

Description: Costs of employee fringe benefits unless treated as part of an approved indirect cost rate. 

Justification: Provide a breakdown of the amounts and percentages that comprise fringe benefit costs such as health insurance, Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) taxes, retirement insurance, and taxes.

Travel

Description:  Costs of out-of-state or overnight project-related travel by employees of the applicant organization. Do not include in-state travel or consultant travel.

Justification:  For each trip show the total number of traveler(s); travel destination; duration of trip; per diem; mileage allowances, if privately owned vehicles will be used to travel out of town; and other transportation costs and subsistence allowances.  If appropriate for this project, travel costs for key project staff to attend ACF-sponsored workshops/conferences/grantee orientations should be detailed in the budget.

Equipment

Description:  "Equipment" means an article of nonexpendable, tangible personal property having a useful life of more than one year per unit and an acquisition cost that equals or exceeds the lesser of:  (a) the capitalization level established by the organization for the financial statement purposes, or (b) $5,000.  (Note:  Acquisition cost means the net invoice unit price of an item of equipment, including the cost of any modifications, attachments, accessories, or auxiliary apparatus necessary to make it usable for the purpose for which it is acquired.  Ancillary charges, such as taxes, duty, protective in-transit insurance, freight, and installation, shall be included in or excluded from acquisition cost in accordance with the applicant organization's regular written accounting practices.) 

Justification:  For each type of equipment requested applicants must provide a description of the equipment; the cost per unit; the number of units; the total cost; and a plan for use of the equipment in the project; as well as a plan for the use, and/or disposal of, the equipment after the project ends.  An applicant organization that uses its own definition for equipment should provide a copy of its policy, or section of its policy, that includes the equipment definition.

Supplies

Description:  Costs of all tangible personal property other than that included under the Equipment category.  This includes office and other consumable supplies with a per-unit cost of less than $5,000.

Justification:  Specify general categories of supplies and their costs.  Show computations and provide other information that supports the amount requested.

Contractual

Description:  Costs of all contracts for services and goods except for those that belong under other categories such as equipment, supplies, construction, etc.  Include third-party evaluation contracts, if applicable, and contracts with secondary recipient organizations (with budget detail), including delegate agencies and specific project(s) and/or businesses to be financed by the applicant.  This area is not for individual consultants.

Justification:  Demonstrate that all procurement transactions will be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open, and free competition. Recipients and subrecipients are required to use 45 CFR 75.328 procedures and must justify any anticipated procurement action that is expected to be awarded without competition and exceeds the simplified acquisition threshold fixed by 41 U.S.C. § 134, as amended by 2 CFR Part 200.88, and currently set at $150,000.  Recipients may be required to make pre-award review and procurement documents, such as requests for proposals or invitations for bids, independent cost estimates, etc., available to ACF.

Note: Whenever the applicant intends to delegate part of the project to another agency, the applicant must provide a detailed budget and budget narrative for each contractor/sub-contractor, by agency title, along with the same supporting information referred to in these instructions.  If the applicant plans to select the contractors/sub-contractors post-award and a detailed budget is not available at the time of application, the applicant must provide information on the nature of the work to be delegated, the estimated costs, and the process for selecting the delegate agency.

Other

Description: Enter the total of all other costs.  Such costs, where applicable and appropriate, may include but are not limited to: consultant costs, local travel; insurance; food (when allowable); medical and dental costs (noncontractual); professional services costs (including audit charges); space and equipment rentals; printing and publication; computer use; training costs, such as tuition and stipends; staff development costs; and administrative costs.

Justification:  Provide computations, a narrative description, and a justification for each cost under this category.

Indirect Charges

Description:  Total amount of indirect costs. This category has one of two methods that an applicant can select.  An applicant may only select one.
 

1) The applicant currently has an indirect cost rate approved by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) or another cognizant federal agency.

Note: An applicant must enclose a copy of the current approved rate agreement.  If the applicant is requesting a rate that is less than what is allowed under the program, the authorized representative of the applicant organization must submit a signed acknowledgement that the applicant is accepting a lower rate than allowed.

2) Per 45 CFR  § 75.414(f) Indirect (F&A) costs, “any non-Federal entity [i.e., applicant] that has never received a negotiated indirect costs rate, … may elect to charge a de minimis rate of 10%  of modified total direct costs (MTDC) which may be used indefinitely.   As described in § 75.403, costs must be consistently charged as either indirect or direct costs, but may not be double charged or inconsistently charged as both.  If chosen, this methodology once elected must be used consistently for all Federal awards until such time as a non-Federal entity chooses to negotiate for a rate, which the non-Federal entity may apply to do at any time.” 

 

Justification:  This method only applies to applicants that have never received an approved negotiated indirect cost rate from HHS or another cognizant federal agency.  Applicants awaiting approval of their indirect cost proposal may request the 10 percent de minimis rate.  When the applicant chooses this method, costs included in the indirect cost pool must not be charged as direct costs to the grant.

Program Income

Description:  The estimated amount of income, if any, expected to be generated from this project. Program income includes, but is not limited to, income from fees for services performed, the use or rental of real or personal property acquired under federally-funded projects, the sale of commodities or items fabricated under an award, license fees and royalties on patents and copyrights, and interest on loans made with award funds. 

Justification:  Describe the nature, source, and anticipated use of program income in the budget or refer to the pages in the application that contain this information.

Commitment of Non-Federal Resources

Description: Amounts of non-federal resources that will be used to support the project as identified in Block 18 of the SF-424.

For all federal awards, any shared costs or matching funds and all contributions, including cash and third-party in-kind contributions, must be accepted as part of the recipient’s cost sharing or matching when such contributions meet all of the criteria listed in 45 CFR § 75.306. 

For awards that require matching by statute, recipients will be held accountable for projected commitments of non-federal resources in their application budgets and budget justifications by budget period, or by project period for fully funded awards, even if the projected commitment exceeds the amount required by the statutory match. A recipient’s failure to provide the statutorily required matching amount may result in the disallowance of federal funds. Recipients will be required to report these funds in the Federal Financial Reports. 

For awards that do not require matching or cost sharing by statute, where “cost sharing” refers to any situation in which the recipient voluntarily shares in the costs of a project other than as statutorily required matching, recipients will be held accountable for projected commitments of non-federal resources in their application budgets and budget justifications by budget period, or by project period for fully funded awards . These include situations in which contributions are voluntarily proposed by an applicant and are accepted by ACF. Non-federal cost sharing will be included in the approved project budget so that the applicant will be held accountable for proposed non-federal cost-sharing funds as shown in the Notice of Award (NOA). A recipient’s failure to provide voluntary cost sharing of non-federal resources that have been accepted by ACF as part of the approved project costs and that have been shown as part of the approved project budget in the NOA, may result in the disallowance of federal funds. Recipients will be required to report these funds in the Federal Financial Reports. 

Justification: If an applicant is relying on match from a third party, then a firm commitment of these resources (letter(s) or other documentation) is required to be submitted with the application. Detailed budget information must be provided for every funding source identified in Item18. "Estimated Funding ($)" on the SF-424. 

Applicants are required to fully identify and document in their applications the specific costs or contributions they propose in order to meet a matching requirement. Applicants are also required to provide documentation in their applications on the sources of funding or contribution(s). In-kind contributions must be accompanied by a justification of how the stated valuation was determined. Matching or cost sharing must be documented by budget period (or by project period for fully funded awards). A recipient’s failure to provide a statutorily required matching amount may result in the disallowance of federal funds.

Applications that lack the required supporting documentation will not be disqualified from competitive review; however, it may impact an application’s scoring under the evaluation criteria in Section V.1. of this announcement.

Paperwork Reduction Disclaimer

As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. §§ 3501-3521, the public reporting burden for the Project Description and Budget/Budget Justification is estimated to average 60 hours per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and reviewing the collection information. The Project Description and Budget/Budget Justification information collection is approved under OMB control number 0970-0139, expiration date is 01/31/2019. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.

    Application Submission Options

    Application Submission Options

Electronic Submission via www.Grants.gov

This section provides the application submission and receipt instructions for ACF program applications. Please read the following instructions carefully and completely.

Electronic Delivery
ACF is participating in the Grants.gov initiative to provide the grant community with a single site to find and apply for grant funding opportunities. ACF applicants are required to submit their applications online through Grants.gov.

How to Register and Apply through Grants.gov
Read the following instructions about registering to apply for ACF funds. Applicants should read the registration instructions carefully and prepare the information requested before beginning the registration process. Reviewing and assembling the required information before beginning the registration process will alleviate last-minute searches for required information.

The registration process can take up to four weeks to complete. Therefore, registration should be done in sufficient time to ensure it does not impact your ability to meet required application submission deadlines.

Organization applicants can find complete instructions here: 
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/organization-registration.html

Obtain a DUNS Number: All entities applying for funding, including renewal funding, must have a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number from Dun & Bradstreet (D&B). Applicants must enter the DUNS number in the data entry field labeled "Organizations DUNS" on the SF-424 form.

For more detailed instructions for obtaining a DUNS number, refer to: 
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/organization-registration/step-1-obtain-duns-number.html

Register with SAM: In addition to having a DUNS number, organizations applying online through Grants.gov must register with the System for Award Management (SAM). All organizations must register with SAM in order to apply online. Failure to register with SAM will prevent your organization from applying through Grants.gov.

For more detailed instructions for registering with SAM, refer to: 
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/organization-registration/step-2-register-with-sam.html

Create a Grants.gov Account: The next step in the registration process is to create an account with Grants.gov. Applicants must know their organization's DUNS number to complete this process. Completing this process automatically triggers an email request for applicant roles to the organization's E-Business Point of Contact (EBiz POC) for review. The EBiz POC is a representative from your organization who is the contact listed for SAM. To apply for grants on behalf of your organization, you will need the AOR role.

For more detailed instructions about creating a profile on Grants.gov, refer to: 
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/registration.html

Authorize Grants.gov Roles: After creating an account on Grants.gov, the EBiz POC receives an email notifying them of your registration and request for roles. The EBiz POC will then log in to Grants.gov and authorize the appropriate roles, which may include the AOR role, thereby giving you permission to complete and submit applications on behalf of your organization. You will be able to submit your application online any time after you have been approved as an AOR.

For more detailed instructions about creating a profile on Grants.gov. refer to:
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/registration/authorize-roles.html

Track Role Status: To track your role request, refer to: 
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/registration/track-role-status.html


When applications are submitted through Grants.gov, the name of the organization's AOR that submitted the application is inserted into the signature line of the application, serving as the electronic signature. The EBiz POC must authorize individuals who are able to make legally binding commitment on behalf of the organization as an AOR; this step is often missed and it is crucial for valid and timely submissions.

How to Submit an Application to ACF via Grants.gov
Grants.gov applicants can apply online using Workspace. Workspace is a shared, online environment where members of a grant team may simultaneously access and edit different webforms within an application. For each FOA, you can create individual instances of a workspace.

The following is an overview of applying via Grants.gov. For access to complete instructions on how to apply for opportunities, refer to: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/apply-for-grants.html 

Create a Workspace: Creating a workspace allows you to complete an application online and route it through your organization for review before submitting.

Complete a Workspace: Add participants to the workspace, complete all the required forms, and check for errors before submission.

Adobe Reader: If you decide not to apply by filling out webforms you can download individual PDF forms in Workspace so that they will appear similar to other Standard or ACF forms. The individual PDF forms can be downloaded and saved to your local device storage, network drive(s), or external drive(s), then accessed through Adobe Reader.

NOTE: Visit the Adobe Software Compatibility page on Grants.gov to download the appropriate version of the software at: 
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/adobe-software-compatibility.html

Mandatory Fields in Forms: In the forms, you will note fields marked with an asterisk and a different background color. These fields are mandatory fields that must be completed to successfully submit your application.

Complete SF-424 Fields First: The forms are designed to fill in common required fields across other forms, such as the applicant name, address, and DUNS number. To trigger this feature, an applicant must complete the SF-424 information first. Once it is completed, the information will transfer to the other forms.

Submit a Workspace: An application may be submitted through workspace by clicking the Sign and Submit button on the Manage Workspace page, under the Forms tab. Grants.gov recommends submitting your application at least 24-48 hours prior to the close date to provide you with time to correct any potential technical issues that may disrupt the application submission.

Track a Workspace: After successfully submitting a workspace package, a Grants.gov Tracking Number (GRANTXXXXXXXX) is automatically assigned to the package. The number will be listed on the Confirmation page that is generated after submission.

For additional training resources, including video tutorials, refer to:
https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/applicant-training.html

Grants.gov provides applicants 24/7 support via the toll-free number 1-800-518-4726 and email at support@grants.gov. For questions related to the specific grant opportunity, contact the number listed in the application package of the grant you are applying for.

If you are experiencing difficulties with your submission, it is best to call the Grants.gov Support Center and get a ticket number. The Support Center ticket number will assist ACF with tracking your issue and understanding background information on the issue.

Timely Receipt Requirements and Proof of Timely Submission
All applications must be received by 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date established for each program. Proof of timely submission is automatically recorded by Grants.gov. An electronic date/time stamp is generated within the system when the application is successfully received by Grants.gov. The applicant AOR will receive an acknowledgement of receipt and a tracking number (GRANTXXXXXXXX) from Grants.gov with the successful transmission of their application. Applicant AORs will also receive the official date/stamp and Grants.gov Tracking number in an email serving as proof of their timely submission.

When ACF successfully retrieves the application from Grants.gov, and acknowledges the download of submission, Grants.gov will provide an electronic acknowledgment of receipt of the application to the email address of the applicant with the AOR role. Again, proof of timely submission shall be the official date and time that Grants.gov receives your application. Applications received by Grants.gov after the established due date for the program will be considered late and will not be considered for funding by ACF.

Applicants with slow internet, such as dial-up connections, should be aware that transmission can take some time before Grants.gov receives your application. Again, Grants.gov will provide either an error or a successfully received transmission in the form of an email sent to the applicant with the AOR role. The Grants.gov Support Center reports that some applicants end the transmission because they think that nothing is occurring during the transmission process. Please be patient and give the system time to process the application.

Issues with Federal Systems
For any systems issues experienced with Grants.gov or SAM.gov, please refer to ACF’s “Policy for Applicants Experiencing Federal Systems Issues” document for complete guidance at www.acf.hhs.gov /sites/default/files/assets/systems_issue_policy_final.pdf.

Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission
To request an exemption from required electronic submission please refer to ACF’s “Policy for Requesting an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission” document for complete guidance at: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/assets/acf_policy_for_requesting_an_exemption_from_required_electronic.pdf.

Paper Format Application Submission
An exemption is required for the submission of paper applications. See the preceding section on "Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission."

Applicants with exemptions that submit their applications in paper format, by mail or delivery, must submit one original and two copies of the complete application with all attachments. The original and each of the two copies must include all required forms, certifications, assurances, and appendices, be signed by the AOR, and be unbound.  The original copy of the application must have original signature(s). See Section IV.7. of this announcement for address information for paper format application submissions. Applications submitted in paper format must be received by 4:30 p.m., ET, on the due date.

Applicants may refer to Section VIII. Other Information for a checklist of application requirements that may be used in developing and organizing application materials.  Details concerning acknowledgment of received applications are available in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times in this announcement.

IV.3. Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM)

IV.3. Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM)

All applicants must have a DUNS Number (http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform) and an active registration with the System for Award Management (SAM.gov/SAM, https://www.sam.gov).

Obtaining a DUNS Number may take 1 to 2 days.

All applicants are required to maintain an active SAM registration until the application process is complete. If a grant is awarded, registration at SAM must be active throughout the life of the award.

Plan ahead. Allow at least 10 business days after you submit your registration for it to become active in SAM and at least an additional 24 hours before that registration information is available in other government systems, i.e. Grants.gov.

This action should allow you time to resolve any issues that may arise. Failure to comply with these requirements may result in your inability to submit your application through Grants.gov or prevent the award of a grant. Applicants should maintain documentation (with dates) of their efforts to register for, or renew a registration, at SAM. User Guides are available under the “Help” tab at https://www.sam.gov.

HHS requires all entities that plan to apply for, and ultimately receive, federal grant funds from any HHS Agency, or receive subawards directly from recipients of those grant funds to:   

  • Be registered in the SAM prior to submitting an application or plan;
  • Maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active award or an application or plan under consideration by an OPDIV; and
  • Provide its active DUNS number in each application or plan it submits to the OPDIV.

ACF is prohibited from making an award until an applicant has complied with these requirements.  At the time an award is ready to be made, if the intended recipient has not complied with these requirements, ACF:

  • May determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award; and
  • May use that determination as a basis for making an award to another applicant.
IV.4. Submission Dates and Times

IV.4. Submission Dates and Times

Due Date for Applications:

04/15/2019

04/15/2020

Explanation of Due Dates

The due date for receipt of applications is listed in the Overview section and in this section. See Section III.3. Other, Application Disqualification Factors.

Electronic Applications
The deadline for submission of electronic applications via www.Grants.gov is 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date. Electronic applications submitted at 12:00 a.m., ET, on the day after the due date will be considered late and will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Applicants are required to submit their applications electronically via www.Grants.gov unless they received an exemption through the process described in Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission.

ACF does not accommodate transmission of applications by email or facsimile.

Instructions for electronic submission via www.Grants.gov are available at: www.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/apply-for-grants.html.

Applications submitted to www.Grants.gov at any time during the open application period prior to the due date and time that fail the Grants.gov validation check will not be received at ACF. These applications will not be acknowledged.

Mailed Paper Format Applications
The deadline for receipt of mailed, paper applications is 4:30 p.m., ET, on the due date. Mailed paper applications received after the due date and deadline time will be considered late and will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Paper format application submissions will be disqualified if the applicant organization has not received an exemption through the process described in Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission.

Hand-Delivered Paper Format Applications
Applications that are hand-delivered by applicants, applicant couriers, by overnight/express mail couriers, or other representatives of the applicant must be received on, or before, the due date listed in the Overview and in this section. These applications must be delivered between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., ET, Monday through Friday (excluding federal holidays). Applications should be delivered to the address provided in Section IV.7.Other Submission Requirements.

Hand-delivered paper applications received after the due date and deadline time will be considered late and will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Hand-delivered paper format application submissions will be disqualified if the applicant organization has not received an exemption through the process described in Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission.

No appeals will be considered for applications classified as late under the following circumstances:

  • Applications submitted electronically via www.Grants.gov are considered late when they are dated and time-stamped after the deadline of 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date.
  • Paper format applications received by mail or hand-delivery after 4:30 p.m., ET, on the due date will be classified as late and will be disqualified.
  • Paper format applications received from applicant organizations that were not approved for an exemption from required electronic application submission under the process described in Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Submission will be disqualified.

Emergency Extensions
ACF may extend an application due date when circumstances make it impossible for an applicant to submit their applications on time. Only events such as documented natural disasters (floods, hurricanes, tornados, etc.), or a verifiable widespread disruption of electrical service, or mail service, will be considered. The determination to extend or waive the due date, and/or receipt time, requirements in an emergency situation rests with the Grants Management Officer listed as the Office of Grants Management Contact in Section VII. HHS Awarding Agency Contact(s).

Acknowledgement from www.Grants.gov
Applicants will receive an initial email upon submission of their application to www.Grants.gov. This email will provide a Grants.gov Tracking Number. Applicants should refer to this tracking number in all communication with Grants.gov. The email will also provide a date and time stamp, which serves as the official record of application's submission. Receipt of this email does not indicate that the application is accepted or that is has passed the validation check.

Applicants will also receive an email acknowledging that the received application is in the Grants.gov validation process, after which a third email is sent with the information that the submitted application package has passed, or failed, the series of checks and validations. Applications that are submitted on time that fail the validation check will not be transmitted to ACF and will not be acknowledged by ACF.

See "What to Expect After Submitting" at www.Grants.gov for more information.

Acknowledgement from ACF of an electronic application's submission:
Applicants will be sent additional email(s) from ACF acknowledging that the application has been retrieved from www.Grants.gov by ACF. Receipt of these emails is not an indication that the application is accepted for competition.

Acknowledgement from ACF of receipt of a paper format application:

ACF will not provide acknowledgement of receipt of hard copy application packages submitted via mail or courier services.

IV.5. Intergovernmental Review

IV.5. Intergovernmental Review

This program is not subject to Executive Order (E.O.) 12372, "Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs," or 45 CFR Part 100, "Intergovernmental Review of Department of Health and Human Services Programs and Activities." No action is required of applicants under this announcement with regard to E.O. 12372.
IV.6. Funding Restrictions

IV.6. Funding Restrictions

Costs of organized fund raising, including financial campaigns, endowment drives, solicitation of gifts and bequests, and similar expenses incurred to raise capital or obtain contributions are unallowable. Fund raising costs for the purposes of meeting the Federal program objectives are allowable with prior written approval from the Federal awarding agency. (45 CFR §75.442)

Proposal costs are the costs of preparing bids, proposals, or applications on potential Federal and non-Federal awards or projects, including the development of data necessary to support the non-Federal entity's bids or proposals. Proposal costs of the current accounting period of both successful and unsuccessful bids and proposals normally should be treated as indirect (F&A) costs and allocated currently to all activities of the non-Federal entity. No proposal costs of past accounting periods will be allocable to the current period. (45 CFR §75.460)

Grant awards will not allow reimbursement of pre-award costs.
Construction is not an allowable activity or expenditure under this grant award.
Purchase of real property is not an allowable activity or expenditure under this grant award.

Costs of prosecution of claims against the Federal Government, including appeals of final HHS agency decisions, are unallowable under 45 CFR §75.435 (g). 

Activities that qualify as major alterations and renovations are not allowable under this FOA.

See Section III.3. Other, Projects Ineligible for Funding for a list of projects that are ineligible for funding under 45 CFR §1336.33. See Section V.2. Review and Selection Process for a list of projects that ANA will not fund.  

Under NAPA, legal expenses of a funded project may be an allowable cost if the expenditure relates to the project and are necessary to fulfill the project’s objectives. Such costs will be reviewed by the same cost principles for all grant costs in 45 CFR part 75 Subpart E.

 

IV.7. Other Submission Requirements

IV.7. Other Submission Requirements

Submit paper applications to one of the following addresses. Also see ACF Policy on Requesting an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission at www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/howto#chapter-6.

Submission By Mail

Tim Chappelle
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
Office of Grants Management - [HHS-2018-ACF-ANA-NA-1339]
Mary E. Switzer Memorial Building
330 C Street, SW.
Washington, DC 20201

Hand Delivery

Tim Chappelle
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
Office of Grants Management - [HHS-2018-ACF-ANA-NA-1339]
Mary E. Switzer Memorial Building
330 C Street, SW.
Washington, DC 20201

Electronic Submission

See Section IV.2. for application requirements and for guidance when submitting applications electronically via www.Grants.gov.

For all submissions, see Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times.

V. Application Review Information

V.1. Criteria

Please note: With the exception of the funding opportunity announcement and relevant statutes and regulations, reviewers will not access, or review, any materials that are not part of the application documents.  This includes information accessible on websites via hyperlinks that are referenced, or embedded, in the application.  Though an application may include web links, or embedded hyperlinks, reviewers will not review this information as it is not considered to be part of the application documents.  Nor will the information on websites be taken into consideration in scoring of evaluation criteria presented in this section. Reviewers will evaluate and score an application based on the documents that are presented in the application and will not refer to, or access, external links during the objective review.

Applications should be prepared based on the application requirements identified in Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description; however, panel reviewers will score applications using the evaluation criteria outlined in this section.

When assessing this section, reviewers should consider the extent to which the application has fully addressed the information as described in Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description, in addition to the specific information that follows.

 

 

Expected Outcomes Maximum Points:35

This section of the review criterion includes all information from the ANA project framework.

Long-Term Community Goal (0 - 2 points)  

  1. The extent to which the application identifies a long-term community goal that aligns with the outcomes and objectives proposed by the project and demonstrates the proposed project is relevant to the achievement of the long-term community goal.

Current Community Condition (0 - 5 points)

  1. The extent to which the application identifies a specific and current community condition that is related to the purpose of the SEDS Program, and the extent to which the current community condition will be directly addressed by the project goal.
  2. How effectively the current community condition identifies the target population and provides basic baseline information about the project beneficiaries, which can be used to show an enhanced condition upon successful completion of project goals and objectives.
  3. The extent to which the current community condition demonstrates knowledge of targeted project participants and/or beneficiaries, is limited to the scope of the proposed project, and demonstrates a need for the proposed project. 
  4. The achievement of the Project Goal and outcomes will positively affect the Community Condition and will continue towards achieving the Long-Term Community Goal after project completion.

Project Goal (0 - 4 points)

  1. The project goal is effectively stated and addresses the current community condition, and the long-term community goal.  The project goal logically aligns to the expected outcome(s) and objective(s) identified for the proposed project and is able to be tracked and measured. 
  2. The target population being served was appropriately included in the identification of the project goal as a means to address their needs.  

Objectives (0 - 7 points) 

  1. The extent to which up to three objective(s) that effectively describe a tangible achievement in a measurable manner.
  2. The extent to which each objective includes all components of the TTIP (target, timeline, indicator and population).

Outcomes and Indicators (0 - 7 points)

  1. The application identifies a primary outcome for each objective, which is directly related to a positive change in the current community condition.
  2. The primary outcome of the objective is a significant and logical result of successful accomplishment of the objective.
  3. The application proposes viable indicator(s) that quantify what will be changed by each outcome in a way that can be effectively observed and measured. 

Outputs (0 - 5 points)

1.The extent to which the application fully identifies all tangible outputs resulting from carrying out project objectives and activities. Outputs are tangible products or services that result from actions taken to achieve project objectives.
2. The extent to which the outputs are feasible and achievable within the timeframe provided in the corresponding objective

Outcome Tracking Strategy (0-4 points)

  1. The application fully identifies an accurate and viable means of measurement for each indicator, which can be effectively and consistently be used to show the progress a project is making toward achieving primary outcome(s). The application includes rational targets for the required points in time (baseline, end of each project year, end of project period, 3 years post project period) which are supported by the means for measurement, organizational capacity, approach, and OWP.
  2. The application provides clear and detailed information describing the plan to collect and manage data/information. Data management tools/systems are indicated, or, if applicable, the need and approach to developing and/or improving a data/information management system is described. Details include available data collection capacity; description of where and how data is stored; plans for analysis of project data; and any technical assistance or staff supports that are or will be provided for data management.

Outcome Tracker (0 - 1 point)

  1. The outcome tracker exhibits connections between the components included in Expected Outcomes (long-term goal, current community condition, project goal, outcomes, and objectives, outputs) in a way that demonstrates logic and validates the ANA project framework as described in Section I. Program Description and Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Description.

 

 

Approach Maximum Points:50

Planning, Readiness and Implementation Strategy (0 - 20 points)

  1. The extent to which the proposed project outcome(s) and objective(s) meets the purpose of the SEDS FOA as described in Section I. Program Description, SEDS Program Purpose.
  2. The application fully describes existing tangible resources and services to implement the project including meeting space, equipment, supplies, curriculum, licenses, permits, etc. The extent to which the application provides details that demonstrate accessibility of existing resources, and maintains any currently held resources, that support successful project implementation.

  3.  

    The application details a plan to secure or produce any tangible resources and services needed to support successful project implementation.
  4. The extent to which the application’s project narrative effectively describes how all milestone activities will be accomplished as reflected in the OWP.

  5.  

    Details reveal planning and preparation for milestone activities and account for all functions and supporting activities, thus demonstrating a fully developed project implementation plan.
  6. The application appropriately cites potential obstacles and challenges to accomplishing project goals and explains strategies that will be used to address these challenges.

  7.  

    The application provides a detailed recruitment and selection process for project participants.
  8. Describes sufficient actions that will be taken to ensure that project outcomes will be sustained and, if applicable, how programmatic sustainability will be achieved.

  9.  

    The application describes an outcome tracking strategy that is feasible and will result in effective project monitoring and evaluation that accurately tracks progress toward achieving project outcomes.

     

Community-Based Strategy (0 - 8 points)

  1. The extent to which the applicant organization demonstrates a connection to the community being served, including an understanding of the target community, and the ability to work with project participants at a level that is appropriate to the project implementation plan.
  2. The extent to which the application includes the appropriate level of community awareness and readiness to accept and participate in the project to the extent necessary for successful implementation, including feasible outreach and retention plans where applicable.
  3. The application emphasizes the community strengths that will support project implementation, and how weaknesses will be overcome, and, where applicable, demonstrates how the project will take full advantage of opportunities to increase local and organizational capacity.
  4. The extent to which project outcomes will support long-term benefits to the target population.
  5. The application demonstrates that the target population was appropriately included in the development of the project as a means to support achievement of their long term goals (e.g. stakeholder meeting agendas or sign-in sheets, surveys, focus groups, etc.).

Personnel, Partnerships and Organizational Capacity (0 - 12 points)

  1. The application documents an organizational executive leadership and staffing structure that will support full program implementation at the start of the grant award, including indication of the (permanent or temporary) PI/PD, identification of project staff, and/or a realistic timeframe and strategy for filling any vacant positions.
  2. The extent to which the application indicates that the combined experience of the proposed project director, key project staff, and key partnerships demonstrates sufficient relevant knowledge, experience, and capabilities (shown by resumes or curricula vitae) to carry out and manage a project of this size, scope, and complexity.
  3. The application details a plan to ensure the effective management and coordination of activities by any partners, contractors and subcontractors, and consultants, including third-party agreements or contracts where applicable.
  4. The application describes contingency plans to address any staff turnover or hiring delays, as well as loss of key partnerships that are critical to the accomplishment of project activities.
  5. The application describes a plan for proper oversight of federal award funds, including the identification of staff and internal controls for financial management, demonstrated knowledge or experience in following federal cost principles, proper and timely disbursement of funds and accurate accounting practices.
  6. The extent to which the application identifies adequate time, data management staff, data systems, and other resources for evaluation and to track outcomes.

Objective Work Plan (OWP) (0 - 10 points)

  1. Directly reflects elements from the project narrative description by consistently stating goals, objectives, outcomes, outputs, and activities.
  2. Provides details and information about the how, when, and by whom, activities described in the project description will be completed, so that the implementation plan is completely described.
  3. Includes a maximum of 25 milestone activities, per objective, per year for project implementation. Milestone activities demonstrate a logical progression from start to finish of key steps needed to accomplish project objectives.
  4. The timeframe for the completion of activities is realistic and relevant for effective project implementation. Start and end dates for activities should align with each budget period.
  5. The extent to which milestone activities are clearly and logically linked to the appropriate project output, and all significant project outputs are supported by milestone activities in the OWP.
Budget and Budget Justification Maximum Points:15

Line Item Budget (0-5 points)

  1. The application includes a line item budget with appropriate object class categories for every year of the project which fully describes how costs are calculated for the federal and non-federal shares.
  2. The application includes funds for all required items for the project budget, including travel to post-award and grantee meeting, as described in Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, The Project Budget and Budget Justification.

Budget Justification (0-10 points)

  1. The application includes budget justification for every year of the project which provides a narrative description of how costs are calculated for each entry in the line item budget. The budget justification includes costs estimates, vendor quotes, and supporting documentation to fully detail federal and non-federal share costs.
  2. The budget and budget justification only includes expenditures relative to project implementation, are based on regional and local fair-market values, and aligns with the Approach and OWP descriptions of project activities.
  3. The extent to which the requested budget is cost-effective and adequately accounts for all necessary resources to implement the proposed project.
  4. The application provides information to demonstrate the commitment of non-federal share contributions equaling 20 percent of the total combined federal and non-federal shares.

 

V.2. Review and Selection Process

V.2. Review and Selection Process

No grant award will be made under this announcement on the basis of an incomplete application.  No grant award will be made to an applicant or sub-recipient that does not have a DUNS number (http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform) and an active registration at SAM (www.sam.gov). See Section IV.3. Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM).

Initial ACF Screening
Each application will be screened to determine whether it meets any of the disqualification factors described in Section III.3.Other, Application Disqualification Factors.

Disqualified applications are considered to be “non-responsive” and are excluded from the competitive review process. Applicants will be notified of a disqualification determination by email or by USPS postal mail within 30 federal business days from the closing date of this FOA.

Objective Review and Results
Applications competing for financial assistance will be reviewed and evaluated by objective review panels using only the criteria described in Section V.1. Criteria of this announcement. Each panel is composed of experts with knowledge and experience in the area under review. Generally, review panels include three reviewers and one chairperson.

Results of the competitive objective review are taken into consideration by ACF in the selection of projects for funding; however, objective review scores and rankings are not binding. Scores and rankings are only one element used in the award decision-making process. 

ACF may elect not to fund applicants with management or financial problems that would indicate an inability to successfully complete the proposed project. Applications may be funded in whole or in part. Successful applicants may be funded at an amount lower than that requested. ACF reserves the right to consider preferences to fund organizations serving emerging, unserved, or under-served populations, including those populations located in pockets of poverty. ACF will also consider the geographic distribution of federal funds in its award decisions.

ACF may refuse funding for projects with what it regards as unreasonably high start-up costs for facilities or equipment, or for projects with unreasonably high operating costs.

ANA Internal Review of Proposed Projects

ANA staff will perform an internal review and analysis of the applications ranked highest as a result of the panel’s review and scoring. This internal review is used to determine the application’s consistency with the purposes of NAPA, all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements, and the requirements of the relevant FOA. 

ANA may use the statistical technique of “normalization” to convert raw scores from review panels to a standardized scale to negate, to the extent possible, any differences in scoring behaviors among different panels and numerous reviewers.

ANA has a preference for funding projects that are community-driven, reflecting a strong relationship between planned activities and intended results, demonstrate a realistic action plan for sustainability, and promote social and economic self-sufficiency in emerging, unserved, or underserved native communities.

ANA’s Commissioner has discretion to make all final funding and award decisions. In exercising discretion in award selection, the Commissioner may choose not to fund any proposed project that:

  • As determined based on ANA’s administrative and programmatic expertise, does not further the purpose of the funding opportunity as described in Section I. Program Description.
  • Has not demonstrated a community-based strategy as described in Section I. Program Description, Key Project Features.
  • Is by a national and regional organization that has not justified their position as the best applicant organization to address the long-term community goal and current community condition described for a local community.
  • Appears to have originated or was designed by consultants outside of the community, who have provided a major role for themselves in the performance of the project, and who are not members of the applicant organization, tribe, or village.
  • Has a flawed implementation plan and is not likely to be successful or cost-effective based on the application submitted for evaluation in response to Section IV.2. The Project Description and Budget and Budget Justification.
  • Allows only one community, or region, to receive a disproportionate share of the funds available for award.
  • Is essentially identical or similar in whole or in part to previously funded projects proposed by the same applicant or activities or projects proposed by a consortium that duplicate activities for which any consortium member also receives or has received funding from ANA.
  • Contains contingent activities that may impede, or indefinitely delay, the progress of the project.
  • Has the potential to cause unintended harm to participants, or that could negatively impact the safety of individuals.
  • Provides loan capital. Federal funds awarded under this FOA may not be used for the purpose of providing loan capital. This restriction is not related to loan capital authorized under Sec. 803A of NAPA [42 U.S.C. 2991b-1(a)(1)] for the purpose of the Hawaiian Revolving Loan fund.
  • Includes human subject research as defined at 45 CFR 46.102 (d) and (f).
  • Is duplicative of projects funded by other federal agencies.
  • Was submitted by an organization that has received funding for two consecutive projects under this FOA's CFDA number. Please see Section I. Program Description, ANA Administrative Policies, Limitation on the Number of Awards Based on Two Consecutive Funding Cycles.
  • Includes activities that were previously implemented without federal assistance.

Appeals
Pursuant to 45 CFR §1336.35, an applicant for ANA funding that has had its application rejected either because it has been found ineligible or because the activities it proposes are ineligible for funding, may appeal the Commissioner’s finding to the Departmental Appeals Board, in writing, within 30 days following receipt of ineligibility notification. See 45 CFR § 1336.35 for procedures for filing such an appeal.

 

 

Federal Awarding Agency Review of Risk Posed by Applicants

As required by 2 CFR Part 200, the Uniform Guidance, effective January 1, 2016, ACF is required to review and consider any information about the applicant that is in the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS), www.fapiis.gov/, before making any award in excess of the simplified acquisition threshold (currently $150,000) over the period of performance. An applicant may review and comment on any information about itself that a federal awarding agency has previously entered into FAPIIS. ACF will consider any comments by the applicant, in addition to other information in FAPIIS, in making a judgment about the applicant's integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under federal awards when completing the review of risk posed by applicants as described in 2 CFR § 200.205 Federal Awarding Agency Review of Risk Posed by Applicants (http://www.ecfr.gov/ cgi-bin/text-idx?node=se2.1.200_1205&rgn=div8).

Please refer to Section IV.2. of this announcement for information on non-federal reviewers in the review process.

Approved but Unfunded Applications

Applications recommended for approval in the objective review process, but not selected for award, may receive funding if additional funds become available or may compete for funding during the next review cycle (if one occurs in the next fiscal year). Applications designated as “approved but unfunded” typically cannot be kept in an active status for more than 12 months. For those applications determined as “approved but unfunded,” notice will be given of the determination by email.

 
 

V.3. Anticipated Announcement and Federal Award Dates

Announcement of awards and the disposition of applications will be provided to applicants at a later date. ACF staff cannot respond to requests for information regarding funding decisions prior to the official applicant notification. 

VI. Federal Award Administration Information

VI.1. Federal Award Notices

Successful applicants will be notified through the issuance of a Notice of Award (NoA) that sets forth the amount of funds granted, the terms and conditions of the grant, the effective date of the grant, the budget period for which initial support will be given, the non-federal share to be provided (if applicable), and the total project period for which support is contemplated. The NoA will be signed by the Grants Officer and transmitted via postal mail, email, or by GrantSolutions.gov or the Head Start Enterprise System (HSES), whichever is relevant. Following the finalization of funding decisions, organizations whose applications will not be funded will be notified by letter signed by the cognizant Program Office head. Any other correspondence that announces to a Principal Investigator, or a Project Director, that an application was selected is not an authorization to begin performance.

Project costs that are incurred prior to the receipt of the NoA are at the recipient's risk and may be reimbursed only to the extent that they are considered allowable as approved pre-award costs. Information on allowable pre-award costs and the time period under which they may be incurred is available in Section IV.6. Funding Restrictions

Grantees may translate the Federal award and other documents into another language. In the event of inconsistency between any terms and conditions of the Federal award and any translation into another language, the English language meaning will control. Where a significant portion of the grantee’s employees who are working on the Federal award are not fluent in English, the grantee must provide the Federal award in English and in the language(s) with which employees are more familiar.

 

VI.2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

Unless otherwise noted in this section, administrative and national policy requirements that are applicable to discretionary grants are available at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/ administrative-and-national-policy-requirements

ANA manages the discretionary grant program in accordance with 45 CFR 1336 - Native American Programs, which can be found at: 
http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/retrieveECFR?gp=1&SID= 46843cfa0cbdd53e439af59c85fa3381&ty=HTML&h=L&mc=true&n= pt45.4.1336&r=PART.

HHS Grants Policy Statement

The HHS Grants Policy Statement (HHS GPS) is the Department of Health and Human Services' single policy guide for discretionary grants and cooperative agreements. ACF grant awards are subject to the requirements of the HHS GPS, which covers basic grants processes, standard terms and conditions, and points of contact, as well as important agency-specific requirements. The general terms and conditions in the HHS GPS will apply as indicated unless there are statutory, regulatory, or award-specific requirements to the contrary that are specified in the Notice of Award (NOA). The HHS GPS is available at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/discretionary-post-award-requirements#chapter-1

Award Term and Condition under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Recipients of federal financial assistance (FFA) from HHS must administer their programs in compliance with federal civil rights law. This includes ensuring your programs are accessible to persons with limited English proficiency. HHS provides guidance to recipients of federal financial assistance (FFA) on meeting their legal obligation to take reasonable steps to provide meaningful access to their programs by persons with limited English proficiency. Please see http://www.hhs.gov/civil-rights/ for-individuals/special-topics/limited- english-proficiency /guidance-federal-financial-assistance-recipients-title-VI/ index.html.

The HHS Office for Civil Rights also provides guidance on complying with civil rights laws enforced by HHS. Please see http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/civilrights /understanding/ section1557/index.html; and http://www.hhs.gov/civil-rights/for-providers/laws-regulations- guidance/laws/index.html. Recipients of FFA also have specific legal obligations for serving qualified individuals with disabilities. Please see http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/civilrights/understanding/ disability/index.html.

Please contact the HHS Office for Civil Rights for more information about obligations and prohibitions under federal civil rights laws at https://www.hhs.gov/ocr/about-us/contact-us/index.html or call 1-800-368-1019 or TDD 1-800-537-7697.

It is an HHS Departmental goal to ensure access to quality, culturally competent care, including long-term services and supports, for vulnerable populations. For further guidance on providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services, recipients should review the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care at https://www.thinkculturalhealth.hhs.gov/assets/pdfs/EnhancedNationalCLASStandards.pdf.

 

 

 

VI.3. Reporting

 
Performance Progress Reports: Semi-Annually

Recipients under this FOA will be required to submit performance progress and financial reports periodically throughout the project period. Information on reporting requirements is available on the ACF website at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/discretionary-post-award-requirements#chapter-2.

ANA grantees are required to report project progress using the Objective Progress Report
(OPR) (OMB No. 0970-0452, expiration date 06/30/2018) on a semi-annual basis. In addition, grantees will be required to submit an Annual Data Report (ADR) [OMB No. 0970-0475, expiration date 03/31/19] to report project data once a year and at the end of the project period. For additional information on reporting requirements and due dates, please refer to the following website: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ana/resource/reporting-requirements.

ANA reviews grantee semiannual and annual reports to determine whether the grantee is meeting its goal and objectives and completing activities identified in the OWP. ANA also performs ongoing monitoring of grantee progress throughout the project period by Program Specialists through phone interviews and site visits. The grantee will submit a non-competing continuation application to receive additional funding. Prior to funding the next budget period of a multi-year grant, ANA requires verification from the grantee that objectives and outcomes proposed in the preceding year were accomplished.


For planning purposes, the frequency of required reporting for awards made under this announcement are as follows:

Financial Reports: Semi-Annually

  

VII. HHS Awarding Agency Contact(s)

Program Office Contact

Carmelia Strickland
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
Administration for Native Americans
Mary E. Switzer Memorial Building
330 C Street, SW., 4th Floor
Washington, DC 20201
Phone: (877) 922-9262
Email: anacomments@acf.hhs.gov
URL: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ana/
 

Office of Grants Management Contact

Tim Chappelle
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
Office of Grants Management, Division of Discretionary Grants
Mary E. Switzer Memorial Building
330 C Street, SW.
Washington, DC 20201
Phone: (202) 401-4855
Email: tim.chappelle@acf.hhs.gov
 

Federal Relay Service:

Hearing-impaired and speech-impaired callers may contact the Federal Relay Service (FedRelay) at www.gsa.gov/fedrelay.

VIII. Other Information

Reference Websites


U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) www.hhs.gov/.

Administration for Children and Families (ACF) www.acf.hhs.gov/.

ACF Funding Opportunities Forecast www.grants.gov/.

ACF Funding Opportunity Announcements ami.grantsolutions.gov/.

ACF "How To Apply For A Grant" https://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/howto.

Grants.gov Accessibility Information www.grants.gov/ web/grants/accessibility-compliance.html.

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)  http://www.ecfr.gov/.

United States Code (U.S.C.)  http://uscode.house.gov/.

Administration for Native Americans (ANA) on the Internet:  http​://www​.acf​.hhs​.gov​/progr​ams​/ana​.

ANA technical assistance providers offer project development training and pre-application training for potential applicants free of charge. Technical Assistance providers may also be contacted within an applicant's region to answer questions:

http​://www​.acf​.hhs​.gov​/progr​ams​/ana​/assis​tance​ 

Project development training materials can be found at:

http​://www​.acf​.hhs​.gov​/progr​ams​/ana​/resou​rce​/ proje​ct​-plann​ing​-and​-devel​opmen​t​-parti​cipan​t​-manua​l​

Pre-application training materials can be found at:

http​://www​.acf​.hhs​.gov​/progr​ams​/ana​/resou​rce​/pre​-appli​catio​n​-train​ing​-manua​l​

ANA Application Toolkit provides examples and templates that may be useful to applicants  https​://www​.acf​.hhs​.gov​/ana​/appli​catio​n​-toolk​it​

 

Application Checklist

 

Applicants may use this checklist as a guide when preparing an application package.

 All forms, certifications, and OMB-approved forms are required and uploaded directly to the Grants.gov application package or included in paper submission when a waiver is approved.  These required application elements are identified at the beginning of the checklist.  

The additional application elements identified in the checklist are ordered based on the preferred order of application assembly as stated below and also referenced in Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission, Formatting Application Submissions.

 

 
What to Submit Where Found When to Submit

SF-424 - Application for Federal Assistance

Referenced in Section IV.2.Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications. 

This form is available in the FOA's forms package at www​.Grant​s​.gov​ in the Mandatory section.

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times.

SF-424A - Budget Information - Non- Construction Programs and SF-424B - Assurances - Non- Construction Programs

Referenced in Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications.

These forms are available in the FOA's forms package at www​.Grant​s​.gov​ in the Mandatory section. 
They are required for applications that include only non-construction activities. 

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times.

 

Unique Entity Identifier (DUNS) and Systems for Award Management (SAM) registration.

Referenced in Section IV.3. Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM) in the announcement.

To obtain a DUNS number (Unique Entity Identifier), go to http​://fedgo​v​.dnb​.com​/webfo​rm​.

To register at SAM, go to http​://www​.sam​.gov​.

A DUNS number (Unique Entity Identifier) and registration at SAM.gov are required for all applicants.

Active registration at SAM must be maintained throughout the application and project award period.

SF-Project/Performance Site Location(s) (SF-P/PSL)

Referenced in Section IV.2.Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications.

This form is available in the FOA's forms package at www​.Grant​s​.gov​.

Submission is due by the application due date found in the
Overview
and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times.

Maintenance of Effort (MOE) Certification

Referenced in Section IV.2. Forms, Assurances, and Certifications. A sample of a standard MOE is available in the application instructions for this FOA at www​.grant​s​.gov​.

Submission is due by the application due date listed in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times. If it is not submitted with the application package, it may also be submitted prior to the award of a grant.

Certification Regarding Lobbying
(Grants.gov Lobbying Form)

Referenced in Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications.

This form is available in the FOA's forms package at www​.Grant​s​.gov​.

Submission is due with the application package or prior to the award of a grant.

SF-LLL - Disclosure of Lobbying Activities

"Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying" is referenced in
Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications.

This form is available in the FOA's forms package at www​.Grant​s​.gov​.

If submission of this form is applicable, it is due at the time of application. 


If it not available at the time of application, it may also be submitted prior to the
award of a grant.

Mandatory Grant Disclosure

Requirement, submission instructions, and mailing addresses are found in the "Mandatory Grant Disclosure"  in Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances and Certifications.

If applicable, concurrent submission to the Administration for Children and Families and to the Office of the Inspector General is required.

Project Summary/Abstract

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.

The Project Summary/Abstract is limited to one single-spaced page.

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times.

Table of Contents

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description

Submit with the application by the due date found in the
Overview
and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times.

The Project Description

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times.

ANA Objective Work Plan (OWP) 

Referenced in Section IV.2. of this announcement.

The OWP form and its instructions are available in the FOA's application form's package at www​.grant​s​.gov​

 

Submit the completed form with the application by the due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times.

The Outcome Tracker

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description and in the Appendix C

Submission is required with the application package by the due date in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times

The Project Budget and Budget Justification

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Budget and Budget Justification.

Submission is required in addition to submission of SF-424A and / or SF-424C.


Submission is required with the application package by the due date in the Overview and in Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times.

Geographic Location

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.

Submission due by the application due date found in Overview and Section IV.4.

Protective of Sensitive and/or Confidential Information

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.4.

Plan for Oversight of Federal Award

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.

Submission due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.4.

Required Governing Body Documentation

Referenced in Section I of the announcement.

If available, submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.4. If not available at the time of application submission, due by the time of award.

Assurance of Community Representation on Board of Directors

Referenced in Section III.3 of the announcement.

If applicable, submission due by the application due date found in Overview and Section IV.4.

Proof of Non-Profit Status

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description, Legal Status of Applicant Entity

Proof of non-profit status should be submitted with the application package by the application due date and time listed in the Overview and Section IV.4. of the FOA. 

If it is not available at the time of application submission, it must be submitted prior to the award of a grant.

Commitment of Non Federal Share Resources

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Budget and Budget Justification.

Submission due by the application due date found in Overview and Section IV.4.

Job Descriptions

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.

Submission due by the application due date found in Overview and Section IV.4.

Resumes

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.

Submission due by the application due date found in Overview and Section IV.4.

Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (IDR)

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Budget and Budget Justification


The IDR must be submitted with the application package. 

If the IDR is available by the application due date, it must be
submitted with the application package. 

If it is not available by the application due date, listed in the Overview and Section IV.4. Submission Dates and Times, it may be submitted prior to the award of a grant.

Letters of Support

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.

Submission due by the application due date found in Overview and Section IV.4.

Third-Party Agreements (also, MOUs and Consortia Agreements)

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.

If available, submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.4. If not available at the time of application submission, due by the time of award.

Business Plans, if applicable

Referenced in Section IV. 2 The Project Description

If applicable, Submission due by the application due date found in Overview and Section IV.4.

Appendix

Appendix A

Suggested Travel Costs

The following are suggested only as guidance in developing travel costs to the required meetings. As with other costs, travel to required meetings must be reasonable and justified in the Budget Justification narrative. 

Applicant's Regional Location Cost per grantee to attend annual ANA Grantee Meeting
Eastern Region* $4,000
Western Region* $4,500
Alaska $5,500
Hawaii $6,000
American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands $8,500

 

*To determine the region you are located in, please refer to the following link: http​://www​.acf​.hhs​.gov​/progr​ams​/ana​/t​-ta​-regio​ns​-map​ 

 

Appendix B

Definitions

Program-specific terms and concepts in this FOA are based on the following definitions: 

Alteration and Renovation: Generally defined as work required to change the interior arrangements or installed equipment in an existing facility so that it may be more effectively used for its designated purpose or adapted for an alternative use to meet a programmatic requirement. 

ANA Project Framework: The ANA Project Framework is intended to outline the project in a way that narrows long-term community goals down to achievable and measurable project outcomes. The ANA Project Framework includes the long-term community goal, current community condition, project goal, objectives, outcomes, indicators, and outputs. Together these components relate a long-term goal for the community to a project goal, define target achievement for the project, and provide a structure to measure project achievement. 

Authorized Organization Representative: The individual(s), named by the applicant/recipient organization, who is authorized to act for the applicant/recipient and to assume the obligations imposed by the federal laws, regulations, requirements, and conditions that apply to grant applications or awards. 

Board Resolution: A current, signed and dated document reflecting a formal decision voted on by the applicant's official governing body in support of the project for the entire project period. The Resolution must indicate who is authorized to sign documents and negotiate on behalf of the tribe or organization. The resolution should indicate that the community was involved in the project planning process and indicate the specific dollar amount of any eligible matching funds (if applicable). A board resolution is an acceptable form of governing body documentation of approval for the project. 

Budget Period: The interval of time (usually 12 months) into which a project period is divided for budgetary and funding purposes. Funding of individual budget periods sometimes is referred to as 'incremental funding.' 

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA): The CFDA is a government-wide compendium of Federal programs, projects, services, and activities that provide assistance or benefits to the American public. It contains financial and nonfinancial assistance programs administered by departments and establishments of the Federal government. A listing of current programs in the CFDA is available at https​://beta​.sam​.gov​ under ?Assistance Listings.?  Each program listed has a unique identifier code known as the CFDA Number.  HHS programs are found under the prefix 93.XXX.  

Construction: Construction of a new building, or major alteration and renovation, including the installation of fixed equipment, but excluding the purchase of land and ancillary improvements (e.g., parking lots or roads). Please note construction costs are not allowable under this funding opportunity. 

Contingency Plan: A set of specific actions to reduce anticipated negative impacts on a project in the event challenges arise, but these actions may not result in major project scope changes, unforeseen risks, or extraordinary events. 

Core Administration: Salaries and other expenses for those functions that support the ongoing operations of an applicant organization as a whole or for purposes that are not related to the actual management or implementation of the ANA-funded project. 

Current Community Condition: A specific and current community condition that is related to the purpose of the SEDS Program. The current community condition should be specific enough to provide general baseline information for the project, so that the achievement of project goals and outcomes can be used to show an enhancement in the condition described. 

Federal Share: The portion of total project costs that are paid by federal funds, 45 CFR§75.2. Financial assistance is provided by ANA in the amount of 80 percent of the approved costs of the project. The Commissioner of ANA may approve assistance in excess of such percentage if such action is in furtherance of the purposes of NAPA, 42 U.S.C. §2991 et seq. See Section III.2. Cost Sharing or Matching for additional information on approvals of federal share in excess of 80 percent. 

Governing Body: A body: (1) consisting of duly elected or designated representatives, (2) appointed by duly elected officials, or (3) selected in accordance with traditional tribal means. The body must have authority to enter into contracts, agreements, and grants on behalf of the organization or individuals who elected, designated, appointed, or selected them. 

Indicator: An indicator is a specific, observable, and measurable characteristic that can be used to show the progress a project is making toward achieving a specific outcome. Indicators are included in the project objective and must describe what will be changed by the objective's outcome. 

In-kind Contributions: The value of non-cash contributions that directly benefit a grant-supported project or program and are provided by non-federal third parties without charge to the recipient, the sub recipient, or a cost-type contractor under a grant or sub award. In-kind contributions may be in the form of real property, equipment, supplies or other expendable property, or goods and services directly benefiting and specifically identifiable to the project or program. Also known as Non-Federal Share. See 45 CFR §75.306, Cost Sharing or matching. 

Loan Capital: Monies derived from grant funds that are used to make loans to individuals or business entities or to establish revolving or other loan accounts or funds.

Long-Term Community Goal: A desired result or potential outcome that the community envisions, plans for, and commits to achieve over an extended period of time in order to create an ideal condition for community members. 

Milestone activities: Milestones, benchmarks, and/or events throughout project implementation to achieve project goals and objectives.

Minor Alterations and Renovations: Costs may not exceed the lesser of $250,000 or 25 percent of the total approved budget for a budget period. This may include changes to physical characteristics that would not involve expansion, new construction, development or repair of parking lots, or activities that would change the footprint of the facility. 

Non-Competing Continuation Award: An award made for additional funding/budget period within a previously approved project period, through a non-competing process. 

Objectives: ANA permits a maximum of three project objectives. Objectives must relate to a primary outcome that addresses the current community condition. To fully quantify the deliverable, each objective should include the following four components (in no particular order):

  • Timeline: a time by which the objective will be achieved
  • Target: a measurement for the intended amount of change
  • Indicator: a measurable sign that something has been done or been achieved
  • Population: a specific group on which the program is intending to focus 

Objective Work Plan (OWP): The plan for achieving the project objectives and producing the outputs and expected outcomes for each objective. The OWP is the blueprint for the project and includes the project goal, objectives, and milestone activities. 

Outcome: Outcome(s) are changes that result from the project, which can occur at the beneficiary, staff, governmental/organizational, or community-level. There is the potential for a project to achieve multiple outcomes; however, ANA requires at least one outcome per objective. 

Outcome Tracking Strategy: Consists of narrative and an outcome tracker. The narrative must describe the means for measuring each project objective/indicator, when and how the project will collect and manage data, and if the applicant organization will use, develop, and/or improve a data management system to collect and assess project data. The outcome tracker must state the project goal, project objective, outcome and indicator for the objective, and the means for measuring the indicator. The outcome tracker must also identify benchmarks for the indicator at the following points in time: baseline (beginning of project), end of each project year, and 3-year post project. 

Output: Outputs are tangible products or services that result from actions taken to achieve project objectives. 

Principal Investigator/Program Director (PI/PD): The individual (s) designated by the recipient to direct the project or program being supported by the grant. The PI/PD is responsible and accountable to officials of the recipient organization for the proper conduct of the project, program, or activity. See 45 CFR §75.2. 

Program Income: Gross income earned by the non-federal entity that is directly generated by a supported activity or earned as a result of the federal award during the period of performance except as provided in §75.307(f). Program income includes, but is not limited to, income from fees for services performed, the use or rental of real or personal property acquired under federal awards, the sale of commodities or items fabricated under a federal award, license fees and royalties on patents and copyrights, and principal and interest on loans made with federal award funds. Interest earned on advances of federal funds is not program income. Except as otherwise provided in federal statutes, regulations, or the terms and conditions of the federal award, program income does not include rebates, credits, discounts, and interest earned on any of them. See 45 CFR  §75.2. 

Project Goal: The project goal is a statement describing what role the project will play in addressing the current community condition. It can describe a reduction or resolution of a negative condition, or it can describe an expanded capacity to successfully address the condition. 

Project Period: The time during which the non-federal entity may incur new obligations to carry out the work authorized under the federal award. The federal awarding agency or pass-through entity must include start dates and end dates of performance in the federal award. (See §§ 75.210(a)(5) and 75.352(a)(1)(v).)

Real Property: Land, including land improvements, structures and appurtenances thereto, but excluding moveable machinery and equipment. See 45 CFR §75.2. 

 

Appendix C

Outcome Tracker

The following is suggested guidance for how to format the Outcome Tracker:

Project Outcome Tracker
Project Goal: Increase physical fitness levels amount the youth in our community, through culturally driven after-school programming
Objective: By the end of 36 months (timeline), there will be a 50 percent increase (target) in fitness levels (indicator) of our high school students ages 13-18 (population) who complete the healthy lifestyles program.
Outcome Indicator Means of Measurement Baseline Project Year 1 Project Year 2 End of Project 3-year Post Project

Our community High School students will adopt behavioral changes leading to healthier lifestyles

Students will increase their fitness levels (strength endurance flexibility and weight).

Individual student assessments which will show increased strength, endurance and flexibility with a decrease in BMI

0% 20% 30% 50% 75%

Outputs: X # of participants completing fitness and nutrition plans, X # of miles walked, X # of nutrition workshops completed, X# of circuit trainings completed, X# of team events completed, X # participate in local Olympic event